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 German Shepherds Schutzhund/Protection Dogs For Sale

The purpose of Schutzhund is to demonstrate the dog's intelligence and utility. It also measures the dog's mental stability, endurance, structural efficiencies, ability to scent, willingness to work, courage, and trainability.

This working dog sport offers an opportunity for dog owners to train their dog and compete with each other for recognition of both the handler's ability to train and the dog's ability to perform as required.

It is a sport enjoyed by persons of varied professions, who join together in a camaraderie born of their common interest in working with their dogs. Persons of all ages and conditions of life including those with significant disabilities enjoy Schutzhund as a sport. Often, it is a family sport.

 German Shepherd Dog Grooming Supplies and Products

Grooming Supplies | The German Shepherd

The German shepherd is not considered a high maintenance dog; however, grooming does require some effort to maintain a beautiful coat, properly trimmed toenails, and white shinny teeth. The shepherd’s double coat, with coarse outer guard hair and a thick, softer undercoat, helps make it a versatile working dog, able to function in just about any climate.

When you go to the pet store to pick up supplies for your German Shepherd Dog, you will need to get a coat rake (undercoat rake), a shedding blade, a rubbery curry brush, a deshedding tool, and a comb – the five integral parts of a German Shepherd dog owner's tool kid. Also important are brushes, nail clippers, and even a shedding rake. When you begin the grooming process go through the entire dog's coat with a slicker brush, beginning at the head and following the lines of the fur to the tail. Then comb through the coat with a metal comb, removing any excess loose hair as you do so. Then go over the whole coat with a rubber curry brush. This will help you make your German Shepherd dog's coat shinier. Your dog will enjoy this too, as the rubber curry brush is a great massage tool. If it's shedding season, finish off your regular grooming process by using a shedding blade, grooming your German Shepherd Dog this time from back to front.

You will however need to be careful with these shedding blades. While they can be enormously helpful to you as a dog owner, particularly during the shedding season, you need to know how to use them correctly in order to avoid harming your dog. Ask a licensed German Shepherd dog groomer or other professional how to use the device properly. Begin by placing the blades on the dog, pulling them back with minimal pressure. It is highly advisable to have a “helper” as part of the process to be on hand to keep the dog still and distracted to avoid any accidents or sudden movement.

Also helpful is the deShedding tool, specifically the FURminator deShed Tool Dog Lrg/Yellow Long Hair for German Shepherds.  This method removes the undercoat better than any other tool, and also distributes skin oils throughout your German Shepherd's body, not to mention the fact that it gives your German Shepherd dog a pretty comfortable massage as well! If you brush your German Shepherd dog after you bathe it, waiting until the dog is almost but not completely dry, the extraneous hair will come out easily. Use a chamois cloth when you're through to give your dog an extra twinkle in its newly shiny coat.

 German Shepherd Service Dogs

Service Animals

The Department of Justice published revised final regulations implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for title II (State and local government services) and title III (public accommodations and commercial facilities) on September 15, 2010, in the Federal Register. These requirements, or rules, clarify and refine issues that have arisen over the past 20 years and contain new, and updated, requirements, including the 2010 Standards for Accessible Design (2010 Standards).

How “Service Animal” Is Defined

Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities.

Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.

This definition does not affect or limit the broader definition of “assistance animal” under the Fair Housing Act or the broader definition of “service animal” under the Air Carrier Access Act.

Some State and local laws also define service animal more broadly than the ADA does. Information about such laws can be obtained from the State attorney general’s office.

If someone's dog calms them when having an anxiety attack, does this qualify it as a service animal?

It depends. The ADA makes a distinction between psychiatric service animals and emotional support animals. If the dog has been trained to sense that an anxiety attack is about to happen and take a specific action to help avoid the attack or lessen its impact, that would qualify as a service animal. However, if the dog's mere presence provides comfort, that would not be considered a service animal under the ADA.

Where Service Animals Are Allowed

Under the ADA, State and local governments, businesses, and nonprofit organizations that serve the public generally must allow service animals to accompany people with disabilities in all areas of the facility where the public is normally allowed to go. For example, in a hospital it would be inappropriate to exclude a service animal from areas such as patient rooms, clinics, cafeterias, or examination rooms. However, it may be appropriate to exclude a service animal from operating rooms or burn units where the animal’s presence may compromise a sterile environment.

Service Animals Must Be Under Control

Under the ADA, service animals must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered, unless these devices interfere with the service animal’s work or the individual’s disability prevents using these devices. In that case, the individual must maintain control of the animal through voice, signal, or other effective controls.

Do they have to be quiet and not bark?

Under control also means that a service animal should not be allowed to bark repeatedly in a lecture hall, theater, library, or other quiet place. However, if a dog barks just once, or barks because someone has provoked it, this would not mean that the dog is out of control.

Do service animals have to wear a vest or patch or special harness identifying them as service animals?

No. The ADA does not require service animals to wear a vest, ID tag, or specific harness.

 German Shepherd Service Dog Collars

German Shepherd Service Dog Collars

Service Dog Collars are not required in the United States but they are optional.

The use of the collar may be beneficial to the Handler.

Some of the Service Dog Collars that are used are Dog Collar with GUIDE DOG Patches, service dog collars, hearing service dog collar, seizure alert service dog collar, certified service dog collar, therapy dog collar, autism dog collar, assistance dog collar, working dog do not pet collar, no petting please dog collar, mobility dog collar, ptsd dog collar and diabetic dog collar.

 

 German Shepherd Dog Muzzles

When to muzzle your dog

By and large, muzzles are used to keep a dog from biting or causing injury. There are two types of muzzles: nylon (also referred to as the "groomer's muzzle") and basket.

Nylon muzzles consist of a wide strip of nylon that surrounds the dog's own muzzle, and two nylon strips that attach behind the ears to hold it in place. The nylon muzzle keeps the mouth in an almost completely closed position. Since their design restricts dogs from panting, nylon muzzles should not be used in hot weather for more than very short periods.

The basket muzzle resembles a basket that fits over the dog's own muzzle, and is normally constructed of wire or heavy plastic. Unlike nylon, the basket muzzle allows a dog to open and close his mouth. However, a dog who is wearing a basket muzzle can still cause harm by jabbing his mouth (called "muzzle punching") at a person or another dog.

So when is muzzling appropriate? Some dogs snap when having nails clipped, being brushed, or being vaccinated. A nylon muzzle is a good idea with a dog who is likely to bite when being handled by a groomer or veterinarian. Muzzles may also be used during training sessions for behavior modification. For example, if a trainer is working with a dog who has handling issues, a muzzle is used in order to ensure the trainer's safety.

Regardless of which type of muzzle is used, the dog should be acclimated to it before use. This can easily be accomplished by pairing food with the muzzle. For the nylon muzzle, stick a small treat through the bottom and let the dog place his nose into the muzzle to take the treat. For the basket muzzle, place a treat into the basket and let the dog take it.

Repeat a few times, and as the dog becomes more comfortable, gradually begin to place the muzzle on the dog, using incremental steps. For example, dog takes treat, hold for five seconds, release; as dog becomes comfortable, dog takes treat, move muzzle back over dog's muzzle, release; next step, bring straps up behind ears, release; eventually, as dog becomes comfortable, attach straps, feed through muzzle, release.

Important: Muzzling an aggressive dog can be a good management solution in a particular situation, but a muzzle should not be used as a substitute for behavior modification.

 Muzzle

When to muzzle your dog

Leather Adjustable Dog Muzzles for German shepherd, basket dog muzzle for gsd , best dog muzzle, training dog muzzle, walking dog muzzles, padded dog muzzle, large dog muzzle, dog with black muzzle, dog black muzzle, metal dog muzzle, types of dog muzzles, buy a dog muzzle, comfortable dog muzzle,  humane dog muzzles, dog muzzle to prevent, Hund einen Maulkorb, Hunde maulkörbe gsd, shepherds Hundemaulkörbe, police muzzle, Schutzhund muzzle, dog training muzzle, k9 muzzle

By and large, muzzles are used to keep a dog from biting or causing injury. There are two types of muzzles: nylon (also referred to as the "groomer's muzzle") and basket.

Nylon muzzles consist of a wide strip of nylon that surrounds the dog's own muzzle, and two nylon strips that attach behind the ears to hold it in place. The nylon muzzle keeps the mouth in an almost completely closed position. Since their design restricts dogs from panting, nylon muzzles should not be used in hot weather for more than very short periods.

The basket muzzle resembles a basket that fits over the dog's own muzzle, and is normally constructed of wire or heavy plastic. Unlike nylon, the basket muzzle allows a dog to open and close his mouth. However, a dog who is wearing a basket muzzle can still cause harm by jabbing his mouth (called "muzzle punching") at a person or another dog.

So when is muzzling appropriate? Some dogs snap when having nails clipped, being brushed, or being vaccinated. A nylon muzzle is a good idea with a dog who is likely to bite when being handled by a groomer or veterinarian. Muzzles may also be used during training sessions for behavior modification. For example, if a trainer is working with a dog who has handling issues, a muzzle is used in order to ensure the trainer's safety.

The brand I recommend has horizontal slats through which slices of hot dog or other food can be passed. The design is useful for classical conditioning--pairing something delightful (slices of hot dog) with something the dog does not necessarily love (being handled)--to modify behavior.

Regardless of which type of muzzle is used, the dog should be acclimated to it before use. This can easily be accomplished by pairing food with the muzzle. For the nylon muzzle, stick a small treat through the bottom and let the dog place his nose into the muzzle to take the treat. For the basket muzzle, place a treat into the basket and let the dog take it.

Repeat a few times, and as the dog becomes more comfortable, gradually begin to place the muzzle on the dog, using incremental steps. For example, dog takes treat, hold for five seconds, release; as dog becomes comfortable, dog takes treat, move muzzle back over dog's muzzle, release; next step, bring straps up behind ears, release; eventually, as dog becomes comfortable, attach straps, feed through muzzle, release.

Important: Muzzling an aggressive dog can be a good management solution in a particular situation, but a muzzle should not be used as a substitute for behavior modification.

 German Shepherd Schutzhund and Protection Dog Trainers

Schutzhund tests dogs of all breeds for the traits necessary for police-type work. Dogs that pass Schutzhund tests should be suitable for a wide variety of tasks: police work, specific odor detection, search and rescue, and many others.

The purpose of Schutzhund is to identify dogs that have or do not have the character traits required for these demanding jobs. Some of those traits are: Strong desire to work - Courage - Intelligence – Trainability - Strong bond to the handler -Perseverance - Protective Instinct. Schutzhund training tests these traits. It also tests physical traits such as strength, endurance, agility, and scenting ability.

The goal of Schutzhund is to illuminate the character of a dog through training. Breeders can use this insight to determine how and whether to use the dog in producing the next generation of working dogs.

 K9 Muzzle

When to muzzle your dog

Leather Adjustable Dog Muzzles for German shepherd, basket dog muzzle for gsd , best dog muzzle, training dog muzzle, walking dog muzzles, padded dog muzzle, large dog muzzle, dog with black muzzle, dog black muzzle, metal dog muzzle, types of dog muzzles, buy a dog muzzle, comfortable dog muzzle,  humane dog muzzles, dog muzzle to prevent, Hund einen Maulkorb, Hunde maulkörbe gsd, shepherds Hundemaulkörbe, police muzzle, Schutzhund muzzle, dog training muzzle, k9 muzzle

By and large, muzzles are used to keep a dog from biting or causing injury. There are two types of muzzles: nylon (also referred to as the "groomer's muzzle") and basket.

Nylon muzzles consist of a wide strip of nylon that surrounds the dog's own muzzle, and two nylon strips that attach behind the ears to hold it in place. The nylon muzzle keeps the mouth in an almost completely closed position. Since their design restricts dogs from panting, nylon muzzles should not be used in hot weather for more than very short periods.

The basket muzzle resembles a basket that fits over the dog's own muzzle, and is normally constructed of wire or heavy plastic. Unlike nylon, the basket muzzle allows a dog to open and close his mouth. However, a dog who is wearing a basket muzzle can still cause harm by jabbing his mouth (called "muzzle punching") at a person or another dog.

So when is muzzling appropriate? Some dogs snap when having nails clipped, being brushed, or being vaccinated. A nylon muzzle is a good idea with a dog who is likely to bite when being handled by a groomer or veterinarian. Muzzles may also be used during training sessions for behavior modification. For example, if a trainer is working with a dog who has handling issues, a muzzle is used in order to ensure the trainer's safety.

The brand I recommend has horizontal slats through which slices of hot dog or other food can be passed. The design is useful for classical conditioning--pairing something delightful (slices of hot dog) with something the dog does not necessarily love (being handled)--to modify behavior.

Regardless of which type of muzzle is used, the dog should be acclimated to it before use. This can easily be accomplished by pairing food with the muzzle. For the nylon muzzle, stick a small treat through the bottom and let the dog place his nose into the muzzle to take the treat. For the basket muzzle, place a treat into the basket and let the dog take it.

Repeat a few times, and as the dog becomes more comfortable, gradually begin to place the muzzle on the dog, using incremental steps. For example, dog takes treat, hold for five seconds, release; as dog becomes comfortable, dog takes treat, move muzzle back over dog's muzzle, release; next step, bring straps up behind ears, release; eventually, as dog becomes comfortable, attach straps, feed through muzzle, release.

Important: Muzzling an aggressive dog can be a good management solution in a particular situation, but a muzzle should not be used as a substitute for behavior modification.

 German Shepherd Schutzhund/IPO Clubs and Organizations

Schutzhund (German for "protection dog") is a dog sport that was developed in Germany in the early 1900s as a breed suitability test for the German Shepherd Dog. The test would determine if the dog displayed the appropriate traits and characteristics of a proper working German Shepherd Dog. Today, it is used as a sport where many breeds other than German Shepherd Dogs can compete, but it is a demanding test for any dog that few can pass.

Traits of Schutzhund dogs

Schutzhund tests dogs of all breeds for the traits necessary for police-type work. Dogs that pass Schutzhund tests should be suitable for a wide variety of tasks: police work, specific odor detection, search and rescue, and many others. The purpose of Schutzhund is to identify dogs that have or do not have the character traits required for these demanding jobs. Some of those traits are:

  • Strong desire to work
  • Courage
  • Intelligence
  • Trainability
  • Strong bond to the handler
  • Perseverance
  • Protective Instinct
  • Sense of Smell

Schutzhund tests for these traits. It also tests for physical traits such as strength, endurance, agility, and scenting ability. The goal of Schutzhund is to illuminate the character and ability of a dog through training. Breeders can use this insight to determine how and whether to use the dog in producing the next generation of working dogs.

History

In response to political forces in Germany, in 2004 the Verein für Deutsche Schäferhunde (SV) and the Deutscher Hundesportverein (DHV) made substantial changes to Schutzhund. The DHV adopted the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) rules that govern IPO titles, so that at least on paper the SV and DHV gave up control of the sport to the FCI. The DHV changed the name of the titles from "SchH" (Schutzhund) to "VPG" (Vielseitigkeitsprüfung für Gebrauchshunde which roughly translates Versatility examination for working dogs). The SV has retained the "SchH" title names, but otherwise conforms to the DHV/FCI rules.

Description

There are three schutzhund titles: Schutzhund 1 (SchH1), Schutzhund 2 (SchH2), and Schutzhund 3 (SchH3). SchH1 is the first title and SchH3 is the most advanced. Additionally, before a dog can compete for an SchH1, he must pass a temperament test called a B or BH (Begleithundprüfung, which translates as "traffic-sure companion dog test"). The B tests basic obedience and sureness around strange people, strange dogs, traffic, and loud noises. A dog that exhibits excessive fear, distractibility, or aggression cannot pass the B and so cannot go on to schutzhund.

The Schutzhund test has changed over the years. Modern Schutzhund consists of three phases: tracking, obedience, and protection. A dog must pass all three phases in one trial to be awarded a schutzhund title. Each phase is judged on a 100-point scale. The minimum passing score is 70 for the tracking and obedience phases and 80 for the protection phase. At any time the judge may dismiss a dog for showing poor temperament, including fear or aggression.

Phase

Description

Tracking

The tracking phase tests not only the dog's scenting ability, but also its mental soundness and physical endurance. In the tracking phase, a track layer walks across a field, dropping several small articles along the way. After a period of time, the dog is directed to follow the track while being followed by the handler on a 33 foot leash. When the dog finds each article, he indicates it, usually by lying down with the article between his front paws. The dog is scored on how intently and carefully it follows the track and indicates the articles. The length, complexity, number of articles, and age of the track varies for each title.

Obedience

The obedience phase is done in a large field, with the dogs working in pairs. One dog is placed in a down position on the side of the field and its handler leaves it while the other dog works in the field. Then the dogs switch places. In the field, there are several heeling exercises, including heeling through a group of people. There are two or three gunshots during the heeling to test the dog's reaction to loud noises. There are one or two recalls, three retrieves (flat, jump and A-frame), and a send out, in which the dog is directed to run away from the handler straight and fast and then lie down on command. Obedience is judged on the dog's accuracy and attitude. The dog must show enthusiasm. A dog that is uninterested or cowering scores poorly.

Protection

In the protection phase, the judge has an assistant, called the "helper", who helps him or her test the dog's courage to protect himself and his handler and its ability to be controlled while doing so. The helper wears a heavily padded sleeve on one arm. There are several blinds, placed where the helper can hide, on the field. The dog is directed to search the blinds for the helper. When it finds the helper, it indicates this by barking. The dog must guard the helper to prevent him from moving until recalled by the handler. There follows a series of exercises similar to police work where the handler searches the helper and transports him to the judge. At specified points, the helper either attacks the dog or the handler or attempts to escape. The dog must stop the attack or the escape by biting the padded sleeve. When the attack or escape stops, the dog is commanded to "out," or release the sleeve. The dog must out or it is dismissed. At all times the dog must show the courage to engage the helper and the temperament to obey the handler while in this high state of drive. Again, the dog must show enthusiasm. A dog that shows fear, lack of control, or inappropriate aggression is dismissed.

 

Training

Schutzhund training, like the sport itself, has evolved over the years. The definitive description of Schutzhund training in the first 50 years of the sport is Col. Konrad Most's Dog Training: A Manual, 1910 By modern standards, Most's training is very harsh and possibly abusive. Despite this, it is also structured, consistent, and in many ways conforms to more recent ideas on learning theory. Over time, the more brutal techniques fell out of use and few trainers still follow Most's program. In 1981, Helmut Raiser published Der Schutzhund (English trans. by Armin Winkler, 1999 (no ISBN)), which radically changed Schutzhund protection training. In the US, the next great change in Schutzhund training is marked by the 1991 publication of Schutzhund Theory & Training Methods by Susan Barwig and Stewart Hilliard. Also see TOP WORKING DOGS, A Schutzhund Training Manual by Dr. Dietmar Schellenberg, first published in 1982. With the fifth edition in

A reliable source for training information is a good Schutzhund club. The overwhelming majority of Schutzhund training is done by owner/handlers at local clubs. There are very few clubs in the US, making books and videos a vital source of information in that country. In the US, most clubs are affiliated with the American Working Dog Federation (AWDF), United States Boxer Association (USBA), American Working Malinois Association (AWMA), United Schutzhund Clubs of America (USA), Deutscher Verband der Gebrauchshundsportvereine (DVG), or German Shepherd Dog Club of America-Working Dog Association (GSDCA-WDA). Schutzhund clubs tend to be small, 20 or less members, because there is a limit to the number of dogs that can be trained in one session. Clubs often provide only limited formal assistance with tracking and obedience. To a certain extent, the clubs exist to provide the specialized resources needed to train the protection phase. However, a legitimate club will not permit a member to train only protection. Usually the more experienced members are willing to help the novice with tracking and obedience, though this is typically somewhat informal in the US.

Another function of Schutzhund clubs is to identify dogs that should not be trained in Schutzhund. Schutzhund is a challenging test of a dog's character, and not every dog, or even every GSD, is up to the challenge. The training director of the club has a responsibility to the dog, handler, club, and society to constantly evaluate every dog and to decline to train any dog with questionable character or working ability. Training a dog that does not really want to work is stressful and frustrating for all parties involved.

Schutzhund clubs regularly hold public trials, providing the opportunity for dogs to earn titles and for handlers to assess their training progress. A tiny number of dedicated handlers have trained their dogs to title readiness strictly from books and videos. This is unlikely to succeed in most cases, because it is almost impossible to train the protection phase without a helper. A good club should be considered a necessity for Schutzhund training.

Organizations

Schutzhund is governed by a number of organizations. The FCI, the international umbrella organization for all things dog related, sets the rules for IPO titles. (IPO is the FCI name for sport Schutzhund titles.) The AZG sets the rules for Schutzhund for all breeds. The AZG is one of the component organizations of the VDH, the all breed kennel club of Germany. The German Shepherd Dog Club of Germany, the SV, is a member of the VDH and arguably the most powerful influence on the sport. Although the AZG formally sets the rules, the AZG does nothing with respect to Schutzhund without the approval of the SV. Still, the SV has great influence in the FCI and is probably still the most powerful influence on the sport. The DVG is an all-breed dog sport organization in Germany that organizes clubs and trials and has branches in Canada and The United States.

The largest Schutzhund organization in the US is the United Schutzhund Clubs of America, called USCA. In spite of its name, USCA is a German Shepherd Dog breed club. The Working Dog Association is a branch of another GSD breed club, the German Shepherd Dog Club of America, which also sponsors clubs and trials. There are a small number of DVG clubs in the United States, various other breed organizations that are involved in Schutzhund, and the American Working Dog Federation (AWDF), which is an umbrella organization. There are other breed specific Schutzhund clubs such as the United Doberman Club. In the case of the Doberman the AKC will not allow you to add Schutzhund titles to your dog's pedigree unless they are earned with the United Doberman Club. This barely scratches the surface.

Search Results

KENNEL VON ARIZONA

KENNEL VON ARIZONA is proud of breeding, raising and training quality German Shepherd puppies/dogs.
Arizona
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07/22/2015
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Arizona Black Shepherds

All puppies go through Early Neurological Stimulation from birth and are tested with the volhard puppy aptitude at 7 weeks Puppies come with AKC registration and a 2 year guarantee
Arizona
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02/19/2013
Type: Offer

Von Klein Stein Working Dogs

Criss has competed in both Schutzhund and AKC competitions. Through his wide knowledge in dog training, he has trained and assisted hundreds of K-9 teams.
Arkansas
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04/13/2013
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Haus Shekinah

We are located in Little Rock, the heart and capital city of the state of Arkansas. Our purpose is to breed the absolute best all around German shepherd possible.
Arkansas
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05/15/2017
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Sundown Kennels

Sundown Kennels has grown to include breeding, boarding and training services offered to families and law enforcement programs.
Arkansas
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04/13/2013
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Vom Tamaraspitze

My name is Alfons van Sweevelt. I've got more than thirty years of experience in the dog sport. As a little boy I was already fond of dogs, andt I bought my first dog when I left my parenthood.
Belgium
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03/01/2013
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Broomeacres German Shepherds

Our goal is to breed puppies with sound minds and healthy bodies combined with balanced temperaments, and that noble look.
British Columbia
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06/15/2013
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Bullinger Shepherds

Bullinger German Shepherds has been the undefeated #1 Breeding Kennel every year we have competed at the Canadian Nationals.
British Columbia
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03/31/2013
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Vom Schwarze-Hunde

Schwarze-Hunde means Black Dogs in German. We feel the name fits us!!
California
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12/20/2011
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Lundborg-Land German Shepherd Dogs

German Shepherd Puppies and Schutzhund German Shepherd Dogs – California Kennels
California
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06/28/2014
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Vom Walters Kennels

Our dogs are all AKC and/or SV registered, and are OFA or SV certified to be free of hip dysplasia.
California
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02/08/2013
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ADLER STEIN KENNELS

WORKING GERMAN SHEPHERD DOGS
California
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03/12/2017
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Zwinger vom Heidelberger Schloss

The German Dog Training Center is a 7 acre facility located in Northern California. It is home to Zwinger vom Heidelberger Schloss, a kennel owned by Thomas Sauerhoefer, a German Shepherd Breeder with nearly three decades of experience breeding, training
California
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02/12/2013
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Service Dog Harness Vest Cool Comfort Nylon for dogs

Purchase comes with 2 IN TRAINING reflective patches (Medium Fits Girth 22-29")
Canada
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10/15/2015
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Shelley's German Shepherds

Home Raise German Shepherd puppies
Colorado
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11/20/2016
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