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 German Shepherd Books

German Shepherd Books

Knowing how to read your German Shepherd dog's body language is the key to understanding your dog, assessing her attitude, and predicting her next move. Because dogs are non-verbal - their body language does the talking for them. Vocalization actually takes second place to a dog's body language. Once you learn these basic types of dog body language, spend some time observing dogs interacting with people and other animals in various situations. Understanding of dog body language can also help protect you and your dog from dangerous situations as well as aid in training or identification of common behavior problems.

Confident

The confident German Shepherd dog stands straight and tall with her head held high, ears perked up, and eyes bright. Her mouth may be slightly open but is relaxed. Her tail may sway gently, curl loosely or hang in a relaxed position. She is friendly, non-threatening and at ease with her surroundings.

Happy

A happy German Shepherd dog will show the same signs as a confident dog. In addition, she will usually wag her tail and sometimes hold her mouth open more or even pant mildly. She appears even more friendly and content than the confident dog, with no signs of anxiety.

Playful

A playful German Shepherd dog is happy and excited. Her ears are up, eyes are bright, and tail wags rapidly. She may jump and run around with glee. Often, a playful dog will exhibit the play bow: front legs stretched forward, head straight ahead, rear end up in the air and possibly wiggling. This is most certainly an invitation to play!

Submissive

A submissive German Shepherd dog holds her head down, ears down flat and averts her eyes. Her tail is low and may sway slightly, but is not tucked. She may roll on her back and expose her belly. A submissive dog may also also nuzzle or lick the other dog or person to further display passive intent. Sometimes, she will sniff the ground or otherwise divert her attention to show that she does not want to cause any trouble. A submissive dog is meek, gentle and non-threatening.

Anxious

The anxious German Shepherd dog may act somewhat submissive, but often holds her ears partially back and her neck stretched out. She stands in a very tense posture and sometimes shudders. Often, an anxious dog whimpers, moans, yawns and/or licks her lips. Her tail is low and may be tucked. She may show the whites of her eyes, something called whale eye An anxious dog may overreact to stimulus and can become fearful or even aggressive. If you are familiar with the dog, you may try to divert her attention to something more pleasant. However, be cautious - do not provoke her or try to soothe her.

Fearful

The fearful German Shepherd dog combines submissive and anxious attitudes with more extreme signals. She stands tense, but is very low to the ground. Her ears are flat back and her eyes are narrowed and averted. Her tail is between her legs and she typically trembles. A fearful dog often whines or growls and might even bare her teeth in defense. She may also urinate or defecate. A fearful dog can turn aggressive quickly if she senses a threat. Do not try to reassure the anxious dog, but remove yourself from the situation calmly. If you are the owner, be confident and strong, but do not comfort or punish your dog. Try to move her to a less threatening, more familiar location.

Dominant

A dominant German Shepherd dog will try to assert herself over other dogs and sometimes people. She stands tall and confident and may lean a bit forward. Her eyes are wide and she makes direct eye contact with the other dog or person. Her ears are up and alert, and the hair on her back may stand on edge. She may growl lowly. Her demeanor appears less friendly and possibly threatening. If the behavior is directed at dog that submits, there is little concern. If the other dog also tries to be dominant, a fight may break out. A dog that directs dominant behavior towards people can pose a serious threat. Do not make eye contact and slowly try to leave. If your dog exhibits this behavior towards people, behavior modification is necessary.

Aggressive

An aggressive German Shepherd dog goes far beyond dominant. All feet are firmly planted on the ground in a territorial manner, and she may lunge forward. Her ears are pinned back, head is straight ahead, and eyes are narrowed but piercing. Her tail is straight, held up high, and may even be wagging. She bares her teeth, snaps her jaw and growls or barks threateningly. The hairs along her back stand on edge. If you are near a dog showing these signs it is very important to get away carefully. Do not run. Do not make eye contact with the dog. Do not show fear. Slowly back away to safety. If your own dog becomes aggressive, seek the assistance of a professional dog trainer to learn the proper way to correct the behavior. Dogs with aggressive behavior should never be used for breeding.

 German Shepherd Key Chains

German Shepherd Key Chains

Keys need style too, and a German Shepherd key chain adds flair in an instant. Stylish and elegant (but not overstated), these are German Shepherd key chains that holds everything together beautifully.

We have a huge selection of German Shepherd Key Chains for all Occasions.

I am sure that you can find the perfect German Shepherd Key Chain at GSDsite.com

 German Shepherd Dog First Aid Kits and Emergency Supplies

Dog Tip: First Aid Kits and Emergency Treatments - Prepare Now!

Those who have faced emergencies can tell you it is essential to get your first aid kit together and get familiar with first aid measures BEFORE you are confronted with an accident, emergency or sudden illness. Many situations require fast and correct action to prevent further injury, infection or death. So assemble a first aid kit now, so that you'll be ready when your pet (or a human) needs immediate help.

Be sure to read through the First Aid Kit list that follows. It will give you an idea of the situations that can and do come up. Being prepared can keep a manageable incident from becoming health-threatening. It will reduce the chance of infection and further complications...reduce stress for everyone...cut recovery time...and empower you to effectively help. Being prepared can even make the difference between life and death.

FIRST AID KIT

Keep a first aid safety kit on hand at home and in your car. Take the one from your car with you when you travel with your pet.

Each kit should include the items listed. It might sound like a lot of stuff, but when an accident occurs, these items can help you save the health or life of an animal...or a human.

Waterproof Kit Container:
Write on the container, in indelible ink, the phone numbers for your vet, the closest emergency animal hospital, and poison control hotlines. Also list your own name, address and phone numbers.

First Aid Guides:
Animal first aid book, such as Dog Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook.

CPR for Dogs

Essential Vet and Contact Info:
Prepare and make copies of a list including:
Phone number for your vet, the closest emergency animal hospital, and poison control hotlines (such as the 2 listed in this tipsheet).
Your own name, address and phone numbers.
Your emergency contact person's numbers, in case you are incapacitated.
The name, age, breed, sex, identification (such as microchipping information), and any health problems (especially useful information if your petsitter or emergency contact needs to call an emergency medical service about your pet).

A copy of your pet vaccination records.
Photo of each pet in case it is needed for ID or other purposes.

Kit Supplies:

Scissors
Tweezers (flat slant tip instead of the rounded variety)
Sterile needle (to remove splinters and tick heads)
Turkey baster or bulb syringe (for flushing wounds, force feeding)
10cc syringe with no needle (for administering medications)
Eyedropper
Tongue depressor to examine mouth

Rubber gloves
Nail clippers
Comb
Rectal thermometer (normal body temperature of dogs and cats is 100.5 to 102.5 F; take your pet's temperature under normal conditions to get a baseline for comparison in case he gets sick or injured)
Disposable safety razor (for shaving fur from around a wound)

Towel (at least 2)
Paper towels
Blanket (the compact thermal blanket works well; uses include keeping an injured animal from going into shock)
Bandanna and/or nylon stocking (many uses, including muzzling or securing a torn earflap)
Strips of cloth
Dog booties or little socks (to cover wounded paws or to protect so you won't need to treat)
Flashlight
Matches

3x3 sterile gauze pads
Rolled gauze (for bandaging, stabilizing joints, making a muzzle)
Adhesive first aid tape (in narrow and wide widths)
Cotton rolled
Cotton balls
Bandages (including self-clinging or vet wrap and waterproof types)
Vet wrap, which sticks to itself but not fur.

Anti-bacterial wipes or pads
Q-tips
Hot/cold pack
Ice pack

Hydrogen peroxide 3% USP (to induce vomiting and to use on infected wounds; check the expiration date from time to time and keep only fresh solution in your kit)
Activated charcoal tablets (effective in absorbing many toxics)

Betadine solution (a type of antiseptic iodine medicine for wounds to deter infection)
Antibiotic ointment (such a Neosporin)
Rubbing alcohol (apply on skin as body cooling agent to aid heat stroke or fever; helps break down oils; acts as a drying agent between toes and skin folds; but do not use on wounds as it can damage skin and is not an appropriate antiseptic)

Bag Balm (especially useful for treating paw pads)
Petroleum jelly (helpful aid for taking temperature)
Sterile saline eye solution (to flush out eye contaminants and wounds)
Artificial tear gel to lubricate eyes after flushing
Eye ointment with no cortisone
Epsom salt (mix 1 teaspoon in 2 cups of warm water for drawing out infection and bathing itchy paws and skin)
Baking soda (good for soothing skin conditions)
Styptic powder (to stop bleeding of torn toenails, etc.)

Milk of magnesia (for stomach upset and certain types of poison ingestion)
Pepto Bismol (for stomach upset and some types of poison ingestion; do not give to cats)
Benadryl (for bug bites and stings and other allergic reactions. Use plain Benadryl, not the other formulas.
Gentle pet sedative such as Rescue Remedy (available at GSDsite.com. Rescue Remedy is a Bach flower essence available in most health food stores. This gentle, natural stress reducing liquid can often help both people and animals recover from injury, fright, illness, travel fatigue and irritation. Put a drop in your water bottle and in their water. To help prevent travel sickness, a common dosage is four drops in the mouth about ten hours before the trip, repeating every four hours as needed. For stressed or injured animals, rub a drop on their ear or put a drop on the towel in their crate or carrier. Flower essences can be used along with conventional medicine.

Aspirin Buffered (for dogs only, 1 tablet per 60 pounds; do not use acetaminophen or ibuprofen; do not give aspirin to cats; since aspirin and other pain relievers can be toxic to any pet, consult your vet and first aid books)

Can of soft pet food (can help reduce the effect of a poisoning)
Mild grease-cutting dishwashing liquid such as Dawn (to clean contaminated skin or sticky substances)
Plastic baggies

Muzzle (an injured or scared animal may try to bite)

 German Shepherd Neck Ties

German Shepherd Neck Ties

Upgrade your wardrobe a custom tie from GSDsite.com! One-of-a-kind ties to match any suit, dress shirt, and occasion. Browse our stylish German Shepherd designs to wear in the office or on a night out in the town.

 
 Medical Alert Bracelets, Charms, Keychains and more.

Who Should Wear a Medical ID?

That's a question we are asked each day at GSDsite.com and a question that you, at some point, may have asked yourself.  There are common misconceptions that by wearing a medical ID you are labeling yourself or bringing unwanted attention to your condition or diagnosis.  The truth is that medical Identification can be, and often times is, life saving. 

If you have been recently diagnosed with a medical condition, a quick diagnosis of your condition will lead to faster and more effective treatment.  Your medical ID bracelet or necklace will alert doctors, paramedics and school nurses of your medical history so that time is not wasted.

Who should wear a medical ID?  

If you’ve been diagnosed with a chronic condition, have food or drug allergies or take medications, then you should wear a medical ID.  Any of the following conditions may alter the treatment you might normally receive. If you are a caregiver you should also wear a medical ID to alert emergency personnel of your loved one who needs attention. Let your medical identification jewelry speak for you when you can’t.

Here is a short list of conditions and people who should wear a medical ID bracelet or medical ID necklace.  If we left anything out of this list, please bring that to our attention by commenting on this post.

  • Diabetes
  • PTSD
  • Heart Patients with Pacemakers, Heart Stents, Atrial Fibrillation, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Arrhythmia
  • Hypertension
  • Lympedema Alert
  • Food Allergies including Peanut Allergy, Tree Nut Allergy, Gluton Intolerace including Celiacs Disease
  • Allergy to Medications such as Penicillin Allergy, Sulfa Allergy, Morphine Allergy, Allergy to Contrast Dye, Bee Sting Allergy, Allergic to Cephalosporins
  • Asthma
  • On Blood Thinners, Von Willebrand's, Hemophilia
  • Gastric Bypass Patient, Lap Band Patient
  • Alzheimers, Memory Impaired
  • Manic Depressive, Schizophrenia
  • Hearing Impaired, Cochlear Implant, Sight Impaired
  • Organ Transplant Patient, Organ Donor
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Adrenal Insufficiency
  • Autism
  • COPD, Seizure Disorder
  • Epilepsy
  • On Multiple Medications
  • No MRI
  • Any other Chronic Condition 
Search Results

German Shepherd Looking Out Window Silver-Colored Square Key Ring

Premium German Shepherd Square Key Ring
Australia/Oceania
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01/02/2017

German Shepherd Mom Keychain Silver-Colored Round Keychain

5 Differnet Key Chain Styles Available
Canada
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05/05/2015
Type: Offer

"One Wish"

White German Shepherd Key Chain
Canada
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02/19/2017

HAWKEYE GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES AND DOGS

At Hawkeye German Shepherds our mission is to utilize world class German bloodlines to produce dogs of exceptional health, temperament and type.
Illinois
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04/09/2015
Type: Offer

Real K9 Solutions, LLC

Serving New Jersey
New Jersey
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01/25/2014
Type: Offer

Shiphra German Shepherds - Athens, Ontario Canada

NEW - We are now Direct Importers of German World Champions, direct sons and daughters, see import page for more details.
Ontario
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05/22/2011
Type: Offer

Patriot K9 Training

With over 20 Years Experience, you can Trust in the Integrity, Dedication and Honor which we will treat your Family Member. Individual or Group Sessions available to Train Your Dog
Pennsylvania
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06/22/2015
Type: Offer

White German Shepherd Keychain

Made of Durable Stone Resin
United States
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05/04/2013
Type: Offer

German Shepherd Mom Keychain Silver-Colored Round Keychain

German Shepherd Mom Keychain What a great gift for a great German Shepherd Mom. Designed by GSDsite.com
United States
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05/04/2015
Type: Offer

Vet's Best Seasonal Allergy Support Supplement for Dogs, 60 Tablets

Great for dogs plagued with seasonal allergies
United States
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05/12/2015

Greenies Canine Dental Chews, Treats For Dogs

For dogs 25 to 50-pound
United States
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05/26/2015

Newman's Own Organics for Puppies & Active Dogs

Ideal for maintaining a dog's optimal body weight and providing long lasting energy
United States
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06/01/2015

Pet Naturals Hip & Joint for Dogs

A comprehensive formula for the support of hip and joint function for dogs in any stage of life
United States
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06/23/2015

Support Law Eforcement Officers Keychain

Beautiful K-9 Thin Blue Line designed key chain. Support Our Law Enforcement Officers.
United States
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01/12/2017

PTSD SERVICE DOG Ask to Pet Rectangle Patch Velcro Double Sided Leash Wrap

Machine Washable - No Shrinkage
United States
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08/03/2014
Type: Offer


All About The German Shepherd : German Shepherd Types and Lines : Designations : German Shepherd Colors and Saddle Types : German Shepherd Dog Names
Schutzhund - IPO : Common German Shepherd Dog Medical Conditions : German Shepherd Dog Anatomy : German Shepherd Dog Heat Stroke Prevention
Deutsch Schäferhund Breed History : The Origins of the Domestic Dog : Cold Weather Precautions For German Shepherd Dogs
Knowing Dog CPR : How Dogs Know What You're Feeling : A dog's tail can tell you a lot more than you might think
German Shepherd Dog Training Tips : About Us : Contact : Privacy Policy : Web Site Agreement

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