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 Bite Pillow/Bite Developer/Bite Tug

Bite Pillow/Bite Developer/Bite Tug

A bite tug is an important drive and retrieve building tool used in dog training. It is used for police, military and Schutzhund dog training. Bite tugs are perfect for puppies but can be used for training adult dogs as well. A bite tug is a good alternative to a solid rubber ball. The latter one is hard on dog's teeth and in situation when a puppy is accidentally hit in the head with a hard rubber ball he can lose drive. If the same dog is hit by a tug he disregards the situation and keeps chasing in drive. Bite pillows are larger tugs which are used for precision bite work training. Bite pillows are more safe and increase accuracy in bite work.

Materials

Traditionally, bite tugs are made of leather, jute, fire hose, synthetic fibers, etc.The harder the material a bite tug is made of the more efforts a dog needs to exert. Durability of a bite tug depends upon quality of materials used to make it. Natural fabrics like leather and jute are safe and non-toxic. Bite tugs made of the natural materials will not endanger a dog's health and dog's teeth in particular. Bite tugs are heavy stuffed with safe materials. Still, it is prohibited to leave a dog with a bite tug alone because a dog can tear it apart and have serious health problems or even choke with the stuffing.

Size and design

There are various dimensions of dog bite tugs. They vary in length and diameter. There are bite tugs with one, two, three handles or with no handle at all. Usually, a dog trainer chooses a bite tug and its design himself relying on his preferences. There are bite tugs with special bags in which treats can be stored.

Puppy training with a bite tug

Long bite tugs are used for puppies. The longer it is the easier for a puppy to bite it. Two-month old puppy can be already trained with a bite tug. Bite tugs suitable for obedience training as well. It is always necessary to encourage a dog for his efforts and attention. Encouragement can be with treats or the bite tug can be given to a dog for some time as a reward.

Adult dog training

The smallest tug is suitable for the training of the kind. Long tugs will not be effective as adult dogs can easily grab them. Bite tugs with handles are easy to use. Tug should be moved very fast so that a dog can not get at it. Short quick movements make a dog move fast. Exercises of this kind help to develop drive.

 German Shepherd Dog Oral, Mouth and Teeth Medicine

German Shepherd Dog Oral, Mouth and Teeth Medicine

8 Dog Mouth Disorders You Need to Be Aware Of

Whenever people think about dog mouth disorders, they most likely think of gingivitis or just a bad case of doggy breath.  However, there are several problems that can occur in your dog’s mouth that you should be aware of. 

1)    Periodontal disease. 

This is a painful infection that occurs between the tooth and the gum.  It can result in tooth loss and if not treated, can spread to the rest of the body.  The most common initial symptoms include loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.

2)    Gingivitis. 

This condition is an inflammation of the gums, caused mainly by plaque and tartar build-up.  To prevent it, you should try your hardest to inhibit disease-producing bacteria from invading your dog’s mouth.  Brush his teeth regularly and check them weekly.  Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath.

3)    Halitosis. 

Halitosis is also known as bad dog breath.  It is often the first sign of mouth issues and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection.  If not treated, it can lead to more serious dental problems.  You can reverse halitosis by brushing your dog’s teeth regularly and getting them cleaned by the veterinarian.

4)    Swollen gums. 

These develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth.  They are also an initial sign of dental problems and can lead to more serious diseases if not treated.  You can also prevent swollen gums through teeth cleaning and regular visits to the vet for check-ups.

5)    Proliferating gum disease. 

This occurs when the gum grows over the teeth.  It must be treated to avoid further infection.  It can be treated with antibiotics and is common in certain dog breeds, such as boxers and bull terriers.  Usually, it is hereditary and you cannot do much to prevent it except for keep an eye on your dog’s mouth.

6)    Mouth tumors. 

These appear as lumps in the gums.  They must be tested by a veterinarian to determine if they are benign or malignant.  Surgically removing the tumors is the only way to treat this problem.

7)    Salivary cysts. 

Salivary cysts are large, unpleasant, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue or near the corners of the jaw.  To treat them, a veterinarian must drain them and remove the damaged saliva gland.

8)    Canine distemper teeth. 

This occurs most often in dogs that had distemper as a puppy.  The teeth are likely to decay and should be removed by a veterinarian if this happens.  Canine distemper cannot be treated and damage is irreversible.

Being aware of these eight dog mouth problems will assist you in providing your dog with optimal dental health.  It will be easier for you to tell when there is a problem so you can get veterinary help right away.

 German Shepherd Books

German Shepherd Books

Knowing how to read your German Shepherd dog's body language is the key to understanding your dog, assessing her attitude, and predicting her next move. Because dogs are non-verbal - their body language does the talking for them. Vocalization actually takes second place to a dog's body language. Once you learn these basic types of dog body language, spend some time observing dogs interacting with people and other animals in various situations. Understanding of dog body language can also help protect you and your dog from dangerous situations as well as aid in training or identification of common behavior problems.

Confident

The confident German Shepherd dog stands straight and tall with her head held high, ears perked up, and eyes bright. Her mouth may be slightly open but is relaxed. Her tail may sway gently, curl loosely or hang in a relaxed position. She is friendly, non-threatening and at ease with her surroundings.

Happy

A happy German Shepherd dog will show the same signs as a confident dog. In addition, she will usually wag her tail and sometimes hold her mouth open more or even pant mildly. She appears even more friendly and content than the confident dog, with no signs of anxiety.

Playful

A playful German Shepherd dog is happy and excited. Her ears are up, eyes are bright, and tail wags rapidly. She may jump and run around with glee. Often, a playful dog will exhibit the play bow: front legs stretched forward, head straight ahead, rear end up in the air and possibly wiggling. This is most certainly an invitation to play!

Submissive

A submissive German Shepherd dog holds her head down, ears down flat and averts her eyes. Her tail is low and may sway slightly, but is not tucked. She may roll on her back and expose her belly. A submissive dog may also also nuzzle or lick the other dog or person to further display passive intent. Sometimes, she will sniff the ground or otherwise divert her attention to show that she does not want to cause any trouble. A submissive dog is meek, gentle and non-threatening.

Anxious

The anxious German Shepherd dog may act somewhat submissive, but often holds her ears partially back and her neck stretched out. She stands in a very tense posture and sometimes shudders. Often, an anxious dog whimpers, moans, yawns and/or licks her lips. Her tail is low and may be tucked. She may show the whites of her eyes, something called whale eye An anxious dog may overreact to stimulus and can become fearful or even aggressive. If you are familiar with the dog, you may try to divert her attention to something more pleasant. However, be cautious - do not provoke her or try to soothe her.

Fearful

The fearful German Shepherd dog combines submissive and anxious attitudes with more extreme signals. She stands tense, but is very low to the ground. Her ears are flat back and her eyes are narrowed and averted. Her tail is between her legs and she typically trembles. A fearful dog often whines or growls and might even bare her teeth in defense. She may also urinate or defecate. A fearful dog can turn aggressive quickly if she senses a threat. Do not try to reassure the anxious dog, but remove yourself from the situation calmly. If you are the owner, be confident and strong, but do not comfort or punish your dog. Try to move her to a less threatening, more familiar location.

Dominant

A dominant German Shepherd dog will try to assert herself over other dogs and sometimes people. She stands tall and confident and may lean a bit forward. Her eyes are wide and she makes direct eye contact with the other dog or person. Her ears are up and alert, and the hair on her back may stand on edge. She may growl lowly. Her demeanor appears less friendly and possibly threatening. If the behavior is directed at dog that submits, there is little concern. If the other dog also tries to be dominant, a fight may break out. A dog that directs dominant behavior towards people can pose a serious threat. Do not make eye contact and slowly try to leave. If your dog exhibits this behavior towards people, behavior modification is necessary.

Aggressive

An aggressive German Shepherd dog goes far beyond dominant. All feet are firmly planted on the ground in a territorial manner, and she may lunge forward. Her ears are pinned back, head is straight ahead, and eyes are narrowed but piercing. Her tail is straight, held up high, and may even be wagging. She bares her teeth, snaps her jaw and growls or barks threateningly. The hairs along her back stand on edge. If you are near a dog showing these signs it is very important to get away carefully. Do not run. Do not make eye contact with the dog. Do not show fear. Slowly back away to safety. If your own dog becomes aggressive, seek the assistance of a professional dog trainer to learn the proper way to correct the behavior. Dogs with aggressive behavior should never be used for breeding.

 German Shepherd Dog Grooming Supplies and Products

Grooming Supplies | The German Shepherd

The German shepherd is not considered a high maintenance dog; however, grooming does require some effort to maintain a beautiful coat, properly trimmed toenails, and white shinny teeth. The shepherd’s double coat, with coarse outer guard hair and a thick, softer undercoat, helps make it a versatile working dog, able to function in just about any climate.

When you go to the pet store to pick up supplies for your German Shepherd Dog, you will need to get a coat rake (undercoat rake), a shedding blade, a rubbery curry brush, a deshedding tool, and a comb – the five integral parts of a German Shepherd dog owner's tool kid. Also important are brushes, nail clippers, and even a shedding rake. When you begin the grooming process go through the entire dog's coat with a slicker brush, beginning at the head and following the lines of the fur to the tail. Then comb through the coat with a metal comb, removing any excess loose hair as you do so. Then go over the whole coat with a rubber curry brush. This will help you make your German Shepherd dog's coat shinier. Your dog will enjoy this too, as the rubber curry brush is a great massage tool. If it's shedding season, finish off your regular grooming process by using a shedding blade, grooming your German Shepherd Dog this time from back to front.

You will however need to be careful with these shedding blades. While they can be enormously helpful to you as a dog owner, particularly during the shedding season, you need to know how to use them correctly in order to avoid harming your dog. Ask a licensed German Shepherd dog groomer or other professional how to use the device properly. Begin by placing the blades on the dog, pulling them back with minimal pressure. It is highly advisable to have a “helper” as part of the process to be on hand to keep the dog still and distracted to avoid any accidents or sudden movement.

Also helpful is the deShedding tool, specifically the FURminator deShed Tool Dog Lrg/Yellow Long Hair for German Shepherds.  This method removes the undercoat better than any other tool, and also distributes skin oils throughout your German Shepherd's body, not to mention the fact that it gives your German Shepherd dog a pretty comfortable massage as well! If you brush your German Shepherd dog after you bathe it, waiting until the dog is almost but not completely dry, the extraneous hair will come out easily. Use a chamois cloth when you're through to give your dog an extra twinkle in its newly shiny coat.

Search Results

War Cry German Shepherds

We offer to the public private obedience lessons and protection training as well as in-kennel training for all breeds of dogs.
California
Show detailsDetails
05/31/2017
Type: Offer

Vom Geisterholz Kennels

Florida German Shepherd Breeder
Florida
Show detailsDetails
07/31/2014
Type: Offer

Sanguard Kennel`s

Our kennel started by importing dogs from Cszeh and Slovakia,we wanted a strong genetic base for our rigouros selection in the future,base that can offer mergeing beauty and great temperament.
Romania
Show detailsDetails
02/05/2013
Type: Offer

Grade A Premium Quality Whole Elk Antler Dog Chew - Large 2-Pack Natural Shed Whole Elk Antlers For Dogs - Made in the USA

Safe, Healthy, Nutritious, Organic, Long Lasting Treat Alternative To Dog Chew Toys, Treats, Snack or Bones
United States
Show detailsDetails
04/14/2015
Type: Offer

Your German Shepherd Puppy Month By Month Paperback

What to ask the breeder before bringing your puppy home
United States
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04/12/2014
Type: Offer

Kong Classic Large Dog Toy, Red

Recommended by veterinarians, trainers, dog professionals, and satisfied customers
United States
Show detailsDetails
08/15/2011
Type: Offer

Greenies Canine Dental Chews, Treats For Dogs

For dogs 25 to 50-pound
United States
Show detailsDetails
05/26/2015

Nylabone Dura Chew Combo Packs

Bristles raised during chewing help clean teeth and control plaque and tartar Provides long-lasting entertainment; fights boredom
United States
Show detailsDetails
06/17/2015
Type: Offer

V-Oratene Drinking Water Additive 4 oz

Enzymatic brushless oral solution
United States
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05/17/2013

PSCPets Joint Assist Treats with Probiotics for Dogs (2.2 Lb)

Veterinarian formulated
United States
Show detailsDetails
05/19/2013
Type: Offer

Hyperflite K-10 Jawz Dog Disc

World's toughest canine competition disc
United States
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10/05/2013
Type: Offer

JW Pet Chompion Dog Toy

Suitable for large and extra large breeds
United States
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01/20/2013
Type: Offer

Planet Dog Big Pup Orbee Ball

100% Guaranteed; Any time, Every time
United States
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03/08/2013
Type: Offer

Pet Buddies Pooch Puff Ball Medium Dog Toy

Dogs can see blue colors
United States
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12/11/2015
Type: Offer

JW Pet Whirlwheel Flying Disk Dog Toy

Strong and safe natural rubber squeaking, flying disk dog toy
United States
Show details$10.27
Show detailsDetails
04/29/2013
Type: Offer


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