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 K-9 German Shepherds
The majority of major police departments in large urban centers include a K9 unit which has specific tasks. These tasks are related to search and rescue, seizure, and other various duties assigned by their branch. The relationship between a police dog and his or her handler requires a closeness and ability to communicate and work together well as a team. A judicious obedience to hand-signals, voice commands, and pre-meditated training procedures is required from the dog. This is complemented by an equal amount of respect, patience, and diligence from the handler.K-9 German Shepherds are also considered Service Dogs.
 Bite Pillow/Bite Developer/Bite Tug

Bite Pillow/Bite Developer/Bite Tug

A bite tug is an important drive and retrieve building tool used in dog training. It is used for police, military and Schutzhund dog training. Bite tugs are perfect for puppies but can be used for training adult dogs as well. A bite tug is a good alternative to a solid rubber ball. The latter one is hard on dog's teeth and in situation when a puppy is accidentally hit in the head with a hard rubber ball he can lose drive. If the same dog is hit by a tug he disregards the situation and keeps chasing in drive. Bite pillows are larger tugs which are used for precision bite work training. Bite pillows are more safe and increase accuracy in bite work.

Materials

Traditionally, bite tugs are made of leather, jute, fire hose, synthetic fibers, etc.The harder the material a bite tug is made of the more efforts a dog needs to exert. Durability of a bite tug depends upon quality of materials used to make it. Natural fabrics like leather and jute are safe and non-toxic. Bite tugs made of the natural materials will not endanger a dog's health and dog's teeth in particular. Bite tugs are heavy stuffed with safe materials. Still, it is prohibited to leave a dog with a bite tug alone because a dog can tear it apart and have serious health problems or even choke with the stuffing.

Size and design

There are various dimensions of dog bite tugs. They vary in length and diameter. There are bite tugs with one, two, three handles or with no handle at all. Usually, a dog trainer chooses a bite tug and its design himself relying on his preferences. There are bite tugs with special bags in which treats can be stored.

Puppy training with a bite tug

Long bite tugs are used for puppies. The longer it is the easier for a puppy to bite it. Two-month old puppy can be already trained with a bite tug. Bite tugs suitable for obedience training as well. It is always necessary to encourage a dog for his efforts and attention. Encouragement can be with treats or the bite tug can be given to a dog for some time as a reward.

Adult dog training

The smallest tug is suitable for the training of the kind. Long tugs will not be effective as adult dogs can easily grab them. Bite tugs with handles are easy to use. Tug should be moved very fast so that a dog can not get at it. Short quick movements make a dog move fast. Exercises of this kind help to develop drive.

 German Shepherd Dog Muzzles

When to muzzle your dog

By and large, muzzles are used to keep a dog from biting or causing injury. There are two types of muzzles: nylon (also referred to as the "groomer's muzzle") and basket.

Nylon muzzles consist of a wide strip of nylon that surrounds the dog's own muzzle, and two nylon strips that attach behind the ears to hold it in place. The nylon muzzle keeps the mouth in an almost completely closed position. Since their design restricts dogs from panting, nylon muzzles should not be used in hot weather for more than very short periods.

The basket muzzle resembles a basket that fits over the dog's own muzzle, and is normally constructed of wire or heavy plastic. Unlike nylon, the basket muzzle allows a dog to open and close his mouth. However, a dog who is wearing a basket muzzle can still cause harm by jabbing his mouth (called "muzzle punching") at a person or another dog.

So when is muzzling appropriate? Some dogs snap when having nails clipped, being brushed, or being vaccinated. A nylon muzzle is a good idea with a dog who is likely to bite when being handled by a groomer or veterinarian. Muzzles may also be used during training sessions for behavior modification. For example, if a trainer is working with a dog who has handling issues, a muzzle is used in order to ensure the trainer's safety.

Regardless of which type of muzzle is used, the dog should be acclimated to it before use. This can easily be accomplished by pairing food with the muzzle. For the nylon muzzle, stick a small treat through the bottom and let the dog place his nose into the muzzle to take the treat. For the basket muzzle, place a treat into the basket and let the dog take it.

Repeat a few times, and as the dog becomes more comfortable, gradually begin to place the muzzle on the dog, using incremental steps. For example, dog takes treat, hold for five seconds, release; as dog becomes comfortable, dog takes treat, move muzzle back over dog's muzzle, release; next step, bring straps up behind ears, release; eventually, as dog becomes comfortable, attach straps, feed through muzzle, release.

Important: Muzzling an aggressive dog can be a good management solution in a particular situation, but a muzzle should not be used as a substitute for behavior modification.

 German Shepherd Dog Waste Supplies and More

5 Important Reasons to Clean up Pet Waste

By Drs. Foster & Smith Veterinary Staff

Dealing with pet waste is one of those topics that every pet owner must deal with but no one likes to talk about. The fact is that the majority of community and neighborhood pet problems result from the inappropriate handling of pet waste. In addition, pet waste is the greatest source of potential health risk for your pet and your family. This article will highlight the five most important reasons to properly dispose of pet waste and will also give you some tips and products to make this chore easier.

#1. Disease Control

There are several very common diseases that can be transmitted to dogs, cats and people through feces. These include giardia, roundworms, salmonella, and Ecoli. In addition, your dog can spread or contract parvovirus or coronavirus through infected feces. All of these diseases are very serious and common and every effort should be made by pet owners to keep their pets and family away from potentially infected feces. One of the easiest ways to do this is to install an in-ground stool digester like the Doggie Dooley. These digesters work like mini septic systems, safely breaking down feces and then allowing the residue to harmlessly sink into the surrounding soil. These handy little gadgets are one of the best ways that I've ever found to deal with dog or cat waste.

#2. Make your Yard more Useable

Nobody likes to walk through a yard that is hiding "doggie land mines." If you and your children are afraid to use your yard because of the dog, then you are wasting one of your biggest time and financial investments. In addition, the pets will get less interactive exercise and suffer as well. Once or twice a day 'scooping' off your yard with a shovel or Grabber pet waste shovel will only take a couple of minutes and make it a place where everyone enjoys spending time.

#3. Fly Control

Flies will consume and lay eggs in feces. These same flies will then come into your house and then spread disease as they pause on your counter and food. Need I say more about keeping feces cleaned up to prevent this cycle?

#4. Responsible Pet Ownership

Your responsibility to clean up after your pet doesn't end when your dog leaves your yard. There are probably fewer things that aggravate neighbors more than a dog that 'goes' in their yard. Pet owners need to clean up after their pet every time they go to the bathroom. Period. No exceptions. If you are walking in the woods and your dog goes, then bury it. If you are in a park or neighborhood, pick it up with a plastic bag or a Dispoz-a-Scoop. If you don't have a yard, then walk your dog on a leash or get an electronic fence. Don't make your responsibility somebody else's problem.

#5. Preventing Stool Eating

While most dog owners think this doesn't apply to them or their dog, the shocking truth is that most dogs will engage in this unsavory practice at some point in their life. Dogs evolved as carnivore/scavengers and feces were considered fair game in lean times. To prevent this occasional indiscretion from becoming a life-long habit, clean up feces as soon as possible, especially in young dogs where the problem is most prevalent. At the first sign of this bad habit consider adding an oral product like Dis-Taste to your dog's food to decrease the palatability of the stools.

Dog poop, urine, and bathroom behavior can tell you a lot about your dog's health.

Chances are, you don't pay much attention to how often your dog does her business or what the results of that business (including dog poop color) look like. Dog stool is gross, it stinks and it belongs outside or in a designated indoor spot. But what else can dog feces tell you? Surprisingly, quite a lot.

"A dog's bowel and urinary habits are outward signs of her health status," says Bess Pierce, DVM, associate professor of community practice at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in Blacksburg, Virginia. "It is important to monitor the amount, frequency, color and consistency of dog feces and urine, giving particular attention to changes in normal pattern."

Determining that normal pattern may take time, because bathroom behavior and dog stool varies from dog to dog. Still, most dogs' bathroom behavior fits within a range, starting with their needing to take two to four bathroom breaks each day. As to what they produce during those bathroom breaks:

  • Dog urine should be light to medium yellow in color without a strong, objectionable odor
  • Dog poop should be moderately firm to firm, and the dog poop color should be a shade of brown.

At times, though, your dog's behavior and feces or urine may vary from that range. When that happens, your dog's body may be signaling the onset of a health problem. Here are some common variations and what they might mean:

1. Straining to urinate.

A dog who tries but can't produce much urine may have urinary stones, which can be fatal if left untreated. See a veterinarian immediately.

2. Very dark urine.

Extremely dark yellow or rust-colored urine may contain blood, which indicates the possibility of a urinary tract infection (UTI). A visit to the vet is in order.

3. Housetraining lapses.

A dog who suddenly starts urinating all over the house also needs to see a veterinarian. The problem could be a UTI or, if she's also drinking a lot of water, it could be a serious condition such as kidney disease, diabetes or Cushing's disease.

4. Straining to defecate.

If your dog's been trying to defecate for a day or so, but can't, she may have a bowel obstruction. Call your veterinarian. If she's vomiting, call sooner.

5. Dog diarrhea.

Runny, stinky dog poop may or may not be serious. Don't feed your dog for a day or so, but make sure she has plenty of water. After a day, start her on a bland diet such as a mixture of boiled rice and hamburger. If your dog still has the trots after two days, put in a call to your vet. If she's vomiting, call sooner. And if she's a young puppy who vomits more than once an hour over a half-day period, bring her to her vet immediately. (More info on Dog Diarrhea)

6. Very dark or black dog poop.

Black dog stool or very dark brown dog stool may signal bleeding in the upper intestinal tract, which can result from many possible problems. A veterinarian's attention is needed.

7. Grey dog feces.

Cement-colored stool may mean that a dog is suffering from an obstruction of the bile duct. The obstruction could have one of several causes -- but, in any case, necessitates a visit to the vet.

8. Changes in poop shape.

 

If your dog's stool is shaped like thin strips, her large intestine or rectum may be narrowed for some reason. On the other hand, very large stools may indicate a problem in the small intestine. Either way, a visit to the vet is in order.

 German Shepherd Boarding

German Shepherd Boarding

The perfect Boarding Kennels should be clean and sanitized, facilities that includes spacious 10 feet by 15 feet heated and air conditioned interior each with ceiling fans which connect to a large 15 feet by 30 feet exterior runs so the dogs can come indoors or go outdoors as they please.

Of course this would be the perfect kennel/boarding but at least you have an idea of what would be ideal.

 Muzzle

When to muzzle your dog

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By and large, muzzles are used to keep a dog from biting or causing injury. There are two types of muzzles: nylon (also referred to as the "groomer's muzzle") and basket.

Nylon muzzles consist of a wide strip of nylon that surrounds the dog's own muzzle, and two nylon strips that attach behind the ears to hold it in place. The nylon muzzle keeps the mouth in an almost completely closed position. Since their design restricts dogs from panting, nylon muzzles should not be used in hot weather for more than very short periods.

The basket muzzle resembles a basket that fits over the dog's own muzzle, and is normally constructed of wire or heavy plastic. Unlike nylon, the basket muzzle allows a dog to open and close his mouth. However, a dog who is wearing a basket muzzle can still cause harm by jabbing his mouth (called "muzzle punching") at a person or another dog.

So when is muzzling appropriate? Some dogs snap when having nails clipped, being brushed, or being vaccinated. A nylon muzzle is a good idea with a dog who is likely to bite when being handled by a groomer or veterinarian. Muzzles may also be used during training sessions for behavior modification. For example, if a trainer is working with a dog who has handling issues, a muzzle is used in order to ensure the trainer's safety.

The brand I recommend has horizontal slats through which slices of hot dog or other food can be passed. The design is useful for classical conditioning--pairing something delightful (slices of hot dog) with something the dog does not necessarily love (being handled)--to modify behavior.

Regardless of which type of muzzle is used, the dog should be acclimated to it before use. This can easily be accomplished by pairing food with the muzzle. For the nylon muzzle, stick a small treat through the bottom and let the dog place his nose into the muzzle to take the treat. For the basket muzzle, place a treat into the basket and let the dog take it.

Repeat a few times, and as the dog becomes more comfortable, gradually begin to place the muzzle on the dog, using incremental steps. For example, dog takes treat, hold for five seconds, release; as dog becomes comfortable, dog takes treat, move muzzle back over dog's muzzle, release; next step, bring straps up behind ears, release; eventually, as dog becomes comfortable, attach straps, feed through muzzle, release.

Important: Muzzling an aggressive dog can be a good management solution in a particular situation, but a muzzle should not be used as a substitute for behavior modification.

 German Shepherd Schutzhund/IPO Clubs and Organizations

Schutzhund (German for "protection dog") is a dog sport that was developed in Germany in the early 1900s as a breed suitability test for the German Shepherd Dog. The test would determine if the dog displayed the appropriate traits and characteristics of a proper working German Shepherd Dog. Today, it is used as a sport where many breeds other than German Shepherd Dogs can compete, but it is a demanding test for any dog that few can pass.

Traits of Schutzhund dogs

Schutzhund tests dogs of all breeds for the traits necessary for police-type work. Dogs that pass Schutzhund tests should be suitable for a wide variety of tasks: police work, specific odor detection, search and rescue, and many others. The purpose of Schutzhund is to identify dogs that have or do not have the character traits required for these demanding jobs. Some of those traits are:

  • Strong desire to work
  • Courage
  • Intelligence
  • Trainability
  • Strong bond to the handler
  • Perseverance
  • Protective Instinct
  • Sense of Smell

Schutzhund tests for these traits. It also tests for physical traits such as strength, endurance, agility, and scenting ability. The goal of Schutzhund is to illuminate the character and ability of a dog through training. Breeders can use this insight to determine how and whether to use the dog in producing the next generation of working dogs.

History

In response to political forces in Germany, in 2004 the Verein für Deutsche Schäferhunde (SV) and the Deutscher Hundesportverein (DHV) made substantial changes to Schutzhund. The DHV adopted the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) rules that govern IPO titles, so that at least on paper the SV and DHV gave up control of the sport to the FCI. The DHV changed the name of the titles from "SchH" (Schutzhund) to "VPG" (Vielseitigkeitsprüfung für Gebrauchshunde which roughly translates Versatility examination for working dogs). The SV has retained the "SchH" title names, but otherwise conforms to the DHV/FCI rules.

Description

There are three schutzhund titles: Schutzhund 1 (SchH1), Schutzhund 2 (SchH2), and Schutzhund 3 (SchH3). SchH1 is the first title and SchH3 is the most advanced. Additionally, before a dog can compete for an SchH1, he must pass a temperament test called a B or BH (Begleithundprüfung, which translates as "traffic-sure companion dog test"). The B tests basic obedience and sureness around strange people, strange dogs, traffic, and loud noises. A dog that exhibits excessive fear, distractibility, or aggression cannot pass the B and so cannot go on to schutzhund.

The Schutzhund test has changed over the years. Modern Schutzhund consists of three phases: tracking, obedience, and protection. A dog must pass all three phases in one trial to be awarded a schutzhund title. Each phase is judged on a 100-point scale. The minimum passing score is 70 for the tracking and obedience phases and 80 for the protection phase. At any time the judge may dismiss a dog for showing poor temperament, including fear or aggression.

Phase

Description

Tracking

The tracking phase tests not only the dog's scenting ability, but also its mental soundness and physical endurance. In the tracking phase, a track layer walks across a field, dropping several small articles along the way. After a period of time, the dog is directed to follow the track while being followed by the handler on a 33 foot leash. When the dog finds each article, he indicates it, usually by lying down with the article between his front paws. The dog is scored on how intently and carefully it follows the track and indicates the articles. The length, complexity, number of articles, and age of the track varies for each title.

Obedience

The obedience phase is done in a large field, with the dogs working in pairs. One dog is placed in a down position on the side of the field and its handler leaves it while the other dog works in the field. Then the dogs switch places. In the field, there are several heeling exercises, including heeling through a group of people. There are two or three gunshots during the heeling to test the dog's reaction to loud noises. There are one or two recalls, three retrieves (flat, jump and A-frame), and a send out, in which the dog is directed to run away from the handler straight and fast and then lie down on command. Obedience is judged on the dog's accuracy and attitude. The dog must show enthusiasm. A dog that is uninterested or cowering scores poorly.

Protection

In the protection phase, the judge has an assistant, called the "helper", who helps him or her test the dog's courage to protect himself and his handler and its ability to be controlled while doing so. The helper wears a heavily padded sleeve on one arm. There are several blinds, placed where the helper can hide, on the field. The dog is directed to search the blinds for the helper. When it finds the helper, it indicates this by barking. The dog must guard the helper to prevent him from moving until recalled by the handler. There follows a series of exercises similar to police work where the handler searches the helper and transports him to the judge. At specified points, the helper either attacks the dog or the handler or attempts to escape. The dog must stop the attack or the escape by biting the padded sleeve. When the attack or escape stops, the dog is commanded to "out," or release the sleeve. The dog must out or it is dismissed. At all times the dog must show the courage to engage the helper and the temperament to obey the handler while in this high state of drive. Again, the dog must show enthusiasm. A dog that shows fear, lack of control, or inappropriate aggression is dismissed.

 

Training

Schutzhund training, like the sport itself, has evolved over the years. The definitive description of Schutzhund training in the first 50 years of the sport is Col. Konrad Most's Dog Training: A Manual, 1910 By modern standards, Most's training is very harsh and possibly abusive. Despite this, it is also structured, consistent, and in many ways conforms to more recent ideas on learning theory. Over time, the more brutal techniques fell out of use and few trainers still follow Most's program. In 1981, Helmut Raiser published Der Schutzhund (English trans. by Armin Winkler, 1999 (no ISBN)), which radically changed Schutzhund protection training. In the US, the next great change in Schutzhund training is marked by the 1991 publication of Schutzhund Theory & Training Methods by Susan Barwig and Stewart Hilliard. Also see TOP WORKING DOGS, A Schutzhund Training Manual by Dr. Dietmar Schellenberg, first published in 1982. With the fifth edition in

A reliable source for training information is a good Schutzhund club. The overwhelming majority of Schutzhund training is done by owner/handlers at local clubs. There are very few clubs in the US, making books and videos a vital source of information in that country. In the US, most clubs are affiliated with the American Working Dog Federation (AWDF), United States Boxer Association (USBA), American Working Malinois Association (AWMA), United Schutzhund Clubs of America (USA), Deutscher Verband der Gebrauchshundsportvereine (DVG), or German Shepherd Dog Club of America-Working Dog Association (GSDCA-WDA). Schutzhund clubs tend to be small, 20 or less members, because there is a limit to the number of dogs that can be trained in one session. Clubs often provide only limited formal assistance with tracking and obedience. To a certain extent, the clubs exist to provide the specialized resources needed to train the protection phase. However, a legitimate club will not permit a member to train only protection. Usually the more experienced members are willing to help the novice with tracking and obedience, though this is typically somewhat informal in the US.

Another function of Schutzhund clubs is to identify dogs that should not be trained in Schutzhund. Schutzhund is a challenging test of a dog's character, and not every dog, or even every GSD, is up to the challenge. The training director of the club has a responsibility to the dog, handler, club, and society to constantly evaluate every dog and to decline to train any dog with questionable character or working ability. Training a dog that does not really want to work is stressful and frustrating for all parties involved.

Schutzhund clubs regularly hold public trials, providing the opportunity for dogs to earn titles and for handlers to assess their training progress. A tiny number of dedicated handlers have trained their dogs to title readiness strictly from books and videos. This is unlikely to succeed in most cases, because it is almost impossible to train the protection phase without a helper. A good club should be considered a necessity for Schutzhund training.

Organizations

Schutzhund is governed by a number of organizations. The FCI, the international umbrella organization for all things dog related, sets the rules for IPO titles. (IPO is the FCI name for sport Schutzhund titles.) The AZG sets the rules for Schutzhund for all breeds. The AZG is one of the component organizations of the VDH, the all breed kennel club of Germany. The German Shepherd Dog Club of Germany, the SV, is a member of the VDH and arguably the most powerful influence on the sport. Although the AZG formally sets the rules, the AZG does nothing with respect to Schutzhund without the approval of the SV. Still, the SV has great influence in the FCI and is probably still the most powerful influence on the sport. The DVG is an all-breed dog sport organization in Germany that organizes clubs and trials and has branches in Canada and The United States.

The largest Schutzhund organization in the US is the United Schutzhund Clubs of America, called USCA. In spite of its name, USCA is a German Shepherd Dog breed club. The Working Dog Association is a branch of another GSD breed club, the German Shepherd Dog Club of America, which also sponsors clubs and trials. There are a small number of DVG clubs in the United States, various other breed organizations that are involved in Schutzhund, and the American Working Dog Federation (AWDF), which is an umbrella organization. There are other breed specific Schutzhund clubs such as the United Doberman Club. In the case of the Doberman the AKC will not allow you to add Schutzhund titles to your dog's pedigree unless they are earned with the United Doberman Club. This barely scratches the surface.

 K9 Muzzle

When to muzzle your dog

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By and large, muzzles are used to keep a dog from biting or causing injury. There are two types of muzzles: nylon (also referred to as the "groomer's muzzle") and basket.

Nylon muzzles consist of a wide strip of nylon that surrounds the dog's own muzzle, and two nylon strips that attach behind the ears to hold it in place. The nylon muzzle keeps the mouth in an almost completely closed position. Since their design restricts dogs from panting, nylon muzzles should not be used in hot weather for more than very short periods.

The basket muzzle resembles a basket that fits over the dog's own muzzle, and is normally constructed of wire or heavy plastic. Unlike nylon, the basket muzzle allows a dog to open and close his mouth. However, a dog who is wearing a basket muzzle can still cause harm by jabbing his mouth (called "muzzle punching") at a person or another dog.

So when is muzzling appropriate? Some dogs snap when having nails clipped, being brushed, or being vaccinated. A nylon muzzle is a good idea with a dog who is likely to bite when being handled by a groomer or veterinarian. Muzzles may also be used during training sessions for behavior modification. For example, if a trainer is working with a dog who has handling issues, a muzzle is used in order to ensure the trainer's safety.

The brand I recommend has horizontal slats through which slices of hot dog or other food can be passed. The design is useful for classical conditioning--pairing something delightful (slices of hot dog) with something the dog does not necessarily love (being handled)--to modify behavior.

Regardless of which type of muzzle is used, the dog should be acclimated to it before use. This can easily be accomplished by pairing food with the muzzle. For the nylon muzzle, stick a small treat through the bottom and let the dog place his nose into the muzzle to take the treat. For the basket muzzle, place a treat into the basket and let the dog take it.

Repeat a few times, and as the dog becomes more comfortable, gradually begin to place the muzzle on the dog, using incremental steps. For example, dog takes treat, hold for five seconds, release; as dog becomes comfortable, dog takes treat, move muzzle back over dog's muzzle, release; next step, bring straps up behind ears, release; eventually, as dog becomes comfortable, attach straps, feed through muzzle, release.

Important: Muzzling an aggressive dog can be a good management solution in a particular situation, but a muzzle should not be used as a substitute for behavior modification.

 German Shepherd Leashes, Collars, Muzzles, Harnesses and more...

Choke Collar: Choke collars are meant to provide a temporary correction. Tightening the chain around the neck gets your dog's attention. Releasing it implies that your dog is doing what you intended. When used correctly, it is not supposed to cut off her breath. The choke collar fits around the strongest part of your dog's neck. This in of itself can present an issue. The problem with a choke collar is that your dog can literally choke herself to death. Never leave a choke collar on your dog while unattended.

Electronic Collar: Also known as the shock collar, an e-collar needs to be used correctly, or it can cause more harm than good. An electronic collar, when handled properly, provides an immediate correction. Since dogs live in the moment, it is imperative that the shock is administered directly - in the split second - the time the undesired behavior occurs. The duration of the pulse should only be one-fortieth of a second and will feel like a mild electric shock.

Important: Always read your e-collar instructions for proper use! Otherwise, your dog may not understand why she is being shocked. And it may damage the trust between you and your dog.

Halter: Also called the halti, or head collar. A halter is designed to lead an animal by its head. This is the same way humans have managed larger animals much stronger than us, such as horses. A halter is also called a Gentle Leader collar. The halter works best on long-nosed dogs, such as German Shepherds. But, without proper use and fitting, it can be ineffective and uncomfortable. The downside to a halter is that your dog may not like the unusual sensation of a loop around her mouth. It is extremely important to have a halter properly fit so that it does not chafe your dog's nose. With proper fit and effective use, it can become a great training tool.

Harness: Harnesses were designed for pulling or tracking. Not for controlling. Huskies were harnessed to pull sleds over the snow. German Shepherds sported a harness to carry loads. And Saint Bernards wore harnesses to rescue people lost in the snow. A harness allows your dog to leverage its entire weight to perform a task. Remember this the next time your dog pulls you down the street while wearing a harness. While tracking, the harness allows your dog to have full contact with the ground, unlike a traditional dog training collar.

No-Pull Harness: Dogs that do not pull may be fine with a harness, but it may trigger a pulling reflex in other dogs. There are harnesses that are designed to be no-pull or anti-pull. These harnesses place a gentle pressure on your dog's chest when she pulls. The sensation is designed to be uncomfortable to discourage pulling. While they do offer more control than a typical harness, it is not the best idea for a dog that you already have difficulty in handling.

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