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 German Shepherd Dog Foot and Paw Care

Top 10 Paw Care Tips For Dogs From GSDsite.com

Your dog’s feet sure are made for walking, but did you know they are also made for protecting? Pads provide extra cushioning to help protect bones and joints from shock, provide insulation against extreme weather, aid walking on rough ground and help protect tissue deep within the paw. With all that work to do, it’s no wonder your pooch’s paws often take a bit of a beating.

Keep a spring in your pet’s step with our top 10 paw care tips:

Pamper With Pedicures: Your dog's nails should just about touch the ground when she walks. If her nails are clicking or getting snagged on the floor, it's time for a pedicure.Snip and Trim: Trim paw hair regularly to avoid painful matting. Simply comb hair out, especially from between the toes, and trim even with the pads.

Clean In Between: Foreign objects can become lodged in your dog’s pads. Check regularly between toes for foxtails, pebbles, small bits of broken glass and other debris. These pesky items can usually be removed with a pair of tweezers.

Moisturize, Moisturize, Moisturize: A dog’s pads can become cracked and dry. GSDsite has good pad moisturizers and use as directed. Avoid human hand moisturizer, as this can soften the pads and lead to injury.

Deep Paw Massage: Similar to giving a human hand massage, a paw massage will relax your dog and promote better circulation. Start by rubbing between the pads on the bottom of the paw, and then rub between each toe. Your dog will be forever grateful for the extra TLC!

Slow and Steady: If you’re about to begin a new exercise program with your dog, start off slow. Paws may become sensitive, chaffed or cracked, particularly when starting your dog out on hikes and runs.

Apply First Aid: It's not unusual for dogs to suffer cuts or other wounds from accidentally stepping on glass, debris or other objects. Wounds that are smaller than a half inch in diameter can be cleaned with an antibacterial wash and wrapped with a light bandage. For deeper paw cuts, see the vet for treatment.

Summertime Sores: Imagine stepping barefoot onto hot pavement. Ouch! It is important to remember your dog’s paws feel heat extremes, too. To prevent burns and blisters, avoid walking your dog on hot pavement or sand. Signs include blisters, loose flaps of skin and red, ulcerated patches. For minor burns, apply antibacterial wash and cover the paw with a loose bandage. For serious burns, visit your vet immediately.

Wintertime Blues: Winter is hard on everyone’s skin, even your dog’s! Bitter cold can cause chapping and cracking. Rock salt and chemical ice melters can cause sores, infection and blistering. Toxic chemicals can also be ingested by your dog when he licks his paws. After outdoor walks, wash your dog’s paws in warm water to rinse away salt and chemicals. You may wish to apply Vaseline, a great salt barrier, to the foot pads before each walk.

Practice Prevention: To reduce the risk of injury, keep your home and yard clear of pointy bits and pieces. Be conscious to avoid hazards such as broken glass and other debris when walking your dog. And keep this simple tip in mind—if you wouldn’t like to walk on it barefoot, neither will your dog!

 German Shepherd Skin and Coat Medicine and Supplements

Just like any proud and responsible dog owner, you would always work for the best to maintain that your dog is always healthy and well-groomed.Tip Number One: Nutrition plays a big role in maintaining your furry friend's fur. Your Shepherds are strong carnivorous which means that the food they eat must be rich in protein, fat and in vitamins. Foods like Beef, Lamb and Chicken are perfect. And if you ever plan to create your own dog's diet, make sure that your mix would be high in these.Tip Number Two: Avoid Vegetables. Unlike humans, dogs' stomachs are straight and not curved. Thus, this makes digesting vegetables hard for them. Stay clear of the vegetables and stick to the high protein regimen above.Tip Number Three: Brush your dog's hairs regularly. By brushing your dog's hair, you contribute in distributing your dog's natural oils. Aside from that, you help prevent matting of the fur and aid in removing dead skin cells.Tip Number Five: Bathe your Dog. Obviously, bathing your dog contributes to maintaining its hygiene. But did you know that a dog should be bathed once or twice a month? German shepherd's natural oils are there for a reason, that's why your dogs shouldn't be bathed more than twice per month. However, frequency of bathing varies depending on the nature of where your dog hangs out. Surely a dog that stays outside will require more baths than one that stays inside.Tip Number Six: Do you See Dust? If you stroke your dog and see dust that means your dog is already due for its bath.The attractive coat of the German Shepherd can unfortunately be quite attractive to parasites too. Beneath the coat on the skin itself, hot spots can be created by skin infections, which can arise from a poor diet or from an infected cut.

 German Shepherd Schutzhund/IPO Clubs and Organizations

Schutzhund (German for "protection dog") is a dog sport that was developed in Germany in the early 1900s as a breed suitability test for the German Shepherd Dog. The test would determine if the dog displayed the appropriate traits and characteristics of a proper working German Shepherd Dog. Today, it is used as a sport where many breeds other than German Shepherd Dogs can compete, but it is a demanding test for any dog that few can pass.

Traits of Schutzhund dogs

Schutzhund tests dogs of all breeds for the traits necessary for police-type work. Dogs that pass Schutzhund tests should be suitable for a wide variety of tasks: police work, specific odor detection, search and rescue, and many others. The purpose of Schutzhund is to identify dogs that have or do not have the character traits required for these demanding jobs. Some of those traits are:

  • Strong desire to work
  • Courage
  • Intelligence
  • Trainability
  • Strong bond to the handler
  • Perseverance
  • Protective Instinct
  • Sense of Smell

Schutzhund tests for these traits. It also tests for physical traits such as strength, endurance, agility, and scenting ability. The goal of Schutzhund is to illuminate the character and ability of a dog through training. Breeders can use this insight to determine how and whether to use the dog in producing the next generation of working dogs.

History

In response to political forces in Germany, in 2004 the Verein für Deutsche Schäferhunde (SV) and the Deutscher Hundesportverein (DHV) made substantial changes to Schutzhund. The DHV adopted the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) rules that govern IPO titles, so that at least on paper the SV and DHV gave up control of the sport to the FCI. The DHV changed the name of the titles from "SchH" (Schutzhund) to "VPG" (Vielseitigkeitsprüfung für Gebrauchshunde which roughly translates Versatility examination for working dogs). The SV has retained the "SchH" title names, but otherwise conforms to the DHV/FCI rules.

Description

There are three schutzhund titles: Schutzhund 1 (SchH1), Schutzhund 2 (SchH2), and Schutzhund 3 (SchH3). SchH1 is the first title and SchH3 is the most advanced. Additionally, before a dog can compete for an SchH1, he must pass a temperament test called a B or BH (Begleithundprüfung, which translates as "traffic-sure companion dog test"). The B tests basic obedience and sureness around strange people, strange dogs, traffic, and loud noises. A dog that exhibits excessive fear, distractibility, or aggression cannot pass the B and so cannot go on to schutzhund.

The Schutzhund test has changed over the years. Modern Schutzhund consists of three phases: tracking, obedience, and protection. A dog must pass all three phases in one trial to be awarded a schutzhund title. Each phase is judged on a 100-point scale. The minimum passing score is 70 for the tracking and obedience phases and 80 for the protection phase. At any time the judge may dismiss a dog for showing poor temperament, including fear or aggression.

Phase

Description

Tracking

The tracking phase tests not only the dog's scenting ability, but also its mental soundness and physical endurance. In the tracking phase, a track layer walks across a field, dropping several small articles along the way. After a period of time, the dog is directed to follow the track while being followed by the handler on a 33 foot leash. When the dog finds each article, he indicates it, usually by lying down with the article between his front paws. The dog is scored on how intently and carefully it follows the track and indicates the articles. The length, complexity, number of articles, and age of the track varies for each title.

Obedience

The obedience phase is done in a large field, with the dogs working in pairs. One dog is placed in a down position on the side of the field and its handler leaves it while the other dog works in the field. Then the dogs switch places. In the field, there are several heeling exercises, including heeling through a group of people. There are two or three gunshots during the heeling to test the dog's reaction to loud noises. There are one or two recalls, three retrieves (flat, jump and A-frame), and a send out, in which the dog is directed to run away from the handler straight and fast and then lie down on command. Obedience is judged on the dog's accuracy and attitude. The dog must show enthusiasm. A dog that is uninterested or cowering scores poorly.

Protection

In the protection phase, the judge has an assistant, called the "helper", who helps him or her test the dog's courage to protect himself and his handler and its ability to be controlled while doing so. The helper wears a heavily padded sleeve on one arm. There are several blinds, placed where the helper can hide, on the field. The dog is directed to search the blinds for the helper. When it finds the helper, it indicates this by barking. The dog must guard the helper to prevent him from moving until recalled by the handler. There follows a series of exercises similar to police work where the handler searches the helper and transports him to the judge. At specified points, the helper either attacks the dog or the handler or attempts to escape. The dog must stop the attack or the escape by biting the padded sleeve. When the attack or escape stops, the dog is commanded to "out," or release the sleeve. The dog must out or it is dismissed. At all times the dog must show the courage to engage the helper and the temperament to obey the handler while in this high state of drive. Again, the dog must show enthusiasm. A dog that shows fear, lack of control, or inappropriate aggression is dismissed.

 

Training

Schutzhund training, like the sport itself, has evolved over the years. The definitive description of Schutzhund training in the first 50 years of the sport is Col. Konrad Most's Dog Training: A Manual, 1910 By modern standards, Most's training is very harsh and possibly abusive. Despite this, it is also structured, consistent, and in many ways conforms to more recent ideas on learning theory. Over time, the more brutal techniques fell out of use and few trainers still follow Most's program. In 1981, Helmut Raiser published Der Schutzhund (English trans. by Armin Winkler, 1999 (no ISBN)), which radically changed Schutzhund protection training. In the US, the next great change in Schutzhund training is marked by the 1991 publication of Schutzhund Theory & Training Methods by Susan Barwig and Stewart Hilliard. Also see TOP WORKING DOGS, A Schutzhund Training Manual by Dr. Dietmar Schellenberg, first published in 1982. With the fifth edition in

A reliable source for training information is a good Schutzhund club. The overwhelming majority of Schutzhund training is done by owner/handlers at local clubs. There are very few clubs in the US, making books and videos a vital source of information in that country. In the US, most clubs are affiliated with the American Working Dog Federation (AWDF), United States Boxer Association (USBA), American Working Malinois Association (AWMA), United Schutzhund Clubs of America (USA), Deutscher Verband der Gebrauchshundsportvereine (DVG), or German Shepherd Dog Club of America-Working Dog Association (GSDCA-WDA). Schutzhund clubs tend to be small, 20 or less members, because there is a limit to the number of dogs that can be trained in one session. Clubs often provide only limited formal assistance with tracking and obedience. To a certain extent, the clubs exist to provide the specialized resources needed to train the protection phase. However, a legitimate club will not permit a member to train only protection. Usually the more experienced members are willing to help the novice with tracking and obedience, though this is typically somewhat informal in the US.

Another function of Schutzhund clubs is to identify dogs that should not be trained in Schutzhund. Schutzhund is a challenging test of a dog's character, and not every dog, or even every GSD, is up to the challenge. The training director of the club has a responsibility to the dog, handler, club, and society to constantly evaluate every dog and to decline to train any dog with questionable character or working ability. Training a dog that does not really want to work is stressful and frustrating for all parties involved.

Schutzhund clubs regularly hold public trials, providing the opportunity for dogs to earn titles and for handlers to assess their training progress. A tiny number of dedicated handlers have trained their dogs to title readiness strictly from books and videos. This is unlikely to succeed in most cases, because it is almost impossible to train the protection phase without a helper. A good club should be considered a necessity for Schutzhund training.

Organizations

Schutzhund is governed by a number of organizations. The FCI, the international umbrella organization for all things dog related, sets the rules for IPO titles. (IPO is the FCI name for sport Schutzhund titles.) The AZG sets the rules for Schutzhund for all breeds. The AZG is one of the component organizations of the VDH, the all breed kennel club of Germany. The German Shepherd Dog Club of Germany, the SV, is a member of the VDH and arguably the most powerful influence on the sport. Although the AZG formally sets the rules, the AZG does nothing with respect to Schutzhund without the approval of the SV. Still, the SV has great influence in the FCI and is probably still the most powerful influence on the sport. The DVG is an all-breed dog sport organization in Germany that organizes clubs and trials and has branches in Canada and The United States.

The largest Schutzhund organization in the US is the United Schutzhund Clubs of America, called USCA. In spite of its name, USCA is a German Shepherd Dog breed club. The Working Dog Association is a branch of another GSD breed club, the German Shepherd Dog Club of America, which also sponsors clubs and trials. There are a small number of DVG clubs in the United States, various other breed organizations that are involved in Schutzhund, and the American Working Dog Federation (AWDF), which is an umbrella organization. There are other breed specific Schutzhund clubs such as the United Doberman Club. In the case of the Doberman the AKC will not allow you to add Schutzhund titles to your dog's pedigree unless they are earned with the United Doberman Club. This barely scratches the surface.

 German Shepherd Dog First Aid Kits and Emergency Supplies

Dog Tip: First Aid Kits and Emergency Treatments - Prepare Now!

Those who have faced emergencies can tell you it is essential to get your first aid kit together and get familiar with first aid measures BEFORE you are confronted with an accident, emergency or sudden illness. Many situations require fast and correct action to prevent further injury, infection or death. So assemble a first aid kit now, so that you'll be ready when your pet (or a human) needs immediate help.

Be sure to read through the First Aid Kit list that follows. It will give you an idea of the situations that can and do come up. Being prepared can keep a manageable incident from becoming health-threatening. It will reduce the chance of infection and further complications...reduce stress for everyone...cut recovery time...and empower you to effectively help. Being prepared can even make the difference between life and death.

FIRST AID KIT

Keep a first aid safety kit on hand at home and in your car. Take the one from your car with you when you travel with your pet.

Each kit should include the items listed. It might sound like a lot of stuff, but when an accident occurs, these items can help you save the health or life of an animal...or a human.

Waterproof Kit Container:
Write on the container, in indelible ink, the phone numbers for your vet, the closest emergency animal hospital, and poison control hotlines. Also list your own name, address and phone numbers.

First Aid Guides:
Animal first aid book, such as Dog Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook.

CPR for Dogs

Essential Vet and Contact Info:
Prepare and make copies of a list including:
Phone number for your vet, the closest emergency animal hospital, and poison control hotlines (such as the 2 listed in this tipsheet).
Your own name, address and phone numbers.
Your emergency contact person's numbers, in case you are incapacitated.
The name, age, breed, sex, identification (such as microchipping information), and any health problems (especially useful information if your petsitter or emergency contact needs to call an emergency medical service about your pet).

A copy of your pet vaccination records.
Photo of each pet in case it is needed for ID or other purposes.

Kit Supplies:

Scissors
Tweezers (flat slant tip instead of the rounded variety)
Sterile needle (to remove splinters and tick heads)
Turkey baster or bulb syringe (for flushing wounds, force feeding)
10cc syringe with no needle (for administering medications)
Eyedropper
Tongue depressor to examine mouth

Rubber gloves
Nail clippers
Comb
Rectal thermometer (normal body temperature of dogs and cats is 100.5 to 102.5 F; take your pet's temperature under normal conditions to get a baseline for comparison in case he gets sick or injured)
Disposable safety razor (for shaving fur from around a wound)

Towel (at least 2)
Paper towels
Blanket (the compact thermal blanket works well; uses include keeping an injured animal from going into shock)
Bandanna and/or nylon stocking (many uses, including muzzling or securing a torn earflap)
Strips of cloth
Dog booties or little socks (to cover wounded paws or to protect so you won't need to treat)
Flashlight
Matches

3x3 sterile gauze pads
Rolled gauze (for bandaging, stabilizing joints, making a muzzle)
Adhesive first aid tape (in narrow and wide widths)
Cotton rolled
Cotton balls
Bandages (including self-clinging or vet wrap and waterproof types)
Vet wrap, which sticks to itself but not fur.

Anti-bacterial wipes or pads
Q-tips
Hot/cold pack
Ice pack

Hydrogen peroxide 3% USP (to induce vomiting and to use on infected wounds; check the expiration date from time to time and keep only fresh solution in your kit)
Activated charcoal tablets (effective in absorbing many toxics)

Betadine solution (a type of antiseptic iodine medicine for wounds to deter infection)
Antibiotic ointment (such a Neosporin)
Rubbing alcohol (apply on skin as body cooling agent to aid heat stroke or fever; helps break down oils; acts as a drying agent between toes and skin folds; but do not use on wounds as it can damage skin and is not an appropriate antiseptic)

Bag Balm (especially useful for treating paw pads)
Petroleum jelly (helpful aid for taking temperature)
Sterile saline eye solution (to flush out eye contaminants and wounds)
Artificial tear gel to lubricate eyes after flushing
Eye ointment with no cortisone
Epsom salt (mix 1 teaspoon in 2 cups of warm water for drawing out infection and bathing itchy paws and skin)
Baking soda (good for soothing skin conditions)
Styptic powder (to stop bleeding of torn toenails, etc.)

Milk of magnesia (for stomach upset and certain types of poison ingestion)
Pepto Bismol (for stomach upset and some types of poison ingestion; do not give to cats)
Benadryl (for bug bites and stings and other allergic reactions. Use plain Benadryl, not the other formulas.
Gentle pet sedative such as Rescue Remedy (available at GSDsite.com. Rescue Remedy is a Bach flower essence available in most health food stores. This gentle, natural stress reducing liquid can often help both people and animals recover from injury, fright, illness, travel fatigue and irritation. Put a drop in your water bottle and in their water. To help prevent travel sickness, a common dosage is four drops in the mouth about ten hours before the trip, repeating every four hours as needed. For stressed or injured animals, rub a drop on their ear or put a drop on the towel in their crate or carrier. Flower essences can be used along with conventional medicine.

Aspirin Buffered (for dogs only, 1 tablet per 60 pounds; do not use acetaminophen or ibuprofen; do not give aspirin to cats; since aspirin and other pain relievers can be toxic to any pet, consult your vet and first aid books)

Can of soft pet food (can help reduce the effect of a poisoning)
Mild grease-cutting dishwashing liquid such as Dawn (to clean contaminated skin or sticky substances)
Plastic baggies

Muzzle (an injured or scared animal may try to bite)

 German Shepherd Leashes, Collars, Muzzles, Harnesses and more...

Choke Collar: Choke collars are meant to provide a temporary correction. Tightening the chain around the neck gets your dog's attention. Releasing it implies that your dog is doing what you intended. When used correctly, it is not supposed to cut off her breath. The choke collar fits around the strongest part of your dog's neck. This in of itself can present an issue. The problem with a choke collar is that your dog can literally choke herself to death. Never leave a choke collar on your dog while unattended.

Electronic Collar: Also known as the shock collar, an e-collar needs to be used correctly, or it can cause more harm than good. An electronic collar, when handled properly, provides an immediate correction. Since dogs live in the moment, it is imperative that the shock is administered directly - in the split second - the time the undesired behavior occurs. The duration of the pulse should only be one-fortieth of a second and will feel like a mild electric shock.

Important: Always read your e-collar instructions for proper use! Otherwise, your dog may not understand why she is being shocked. And it may damage the trust between you and your dog.

Halter: Also called the halti, or head collar. A halter is designed to lead an animal by its head. This is the same way humans have managed larger animals much stronger than us, such as horses. A halter is also called a Gentle Leader collar. The halter works best on long-nosed dogs, such as German Shepherds. But, without proper use and fitting, it can be ineffective and uncomfortable. The downside to a halter is that your dog may not like the unusual sensation of a loop around her mouth. It is extremely important to have a halter properly fit so that it does not chafe your dog's nose. With proper fit and effective use, it can become a great training tool.

Harness: Harnesses were designed for pulling or tracking. Not for controlling. Huskies were harnessed to pull sleds over the snow. German Shepherds sported a harness to carry loads. And Saint Bernards wore harnesses to rescue people lost in the snow. A harness allows your dog to leverage its entire weight to perform a task. Remember this the next time your dog pulls you down the street while wearing a harness. While tracking, the harness allows your dog to have full contact with the ground, unlike a traditional dog training collar.

No-Pull Harness: Dogs that do not pull may be fine with a harness, but it may trigger a pulling reflex in other dogs. There are harnesses that are designed to be no-pull or anti-pull. These harnesses place a gentle pressure on your dog's chest when she pulls. The sensation is designed to be uncomfortable to discourage pulling. While they do offer more control than a typical harness, it is not the best idea for a dog that you already have difficulty in handling.

 German Shepherd Dog Whelping Supplies

The big day is fast approaching. You should have all of the supplies ready and waiting at least a week before the expected due date.

The whelping box is the single biggest item needed. It should provide enough room for the bitch to lay and stretch out comfortably without being so big that the puppies get 'lost.' For large breed dogs, it is also nice if a person can sit in the box with mom during labor and delivery and to play with the puppies later. The floor must be level and stable. The sides should be high enough to keep 4-week-old puppies in, but be hinged or have a door so the bitch can come and go. The sides may set inside the edges of the floor. This allows a blanket to be stretched tight over the floor and held in place by the sides. A safety rail is necessary around the entire perimeter. This allows the puppies to fit underneath in case the bitch lays down and they are in the way. It should be high and wide enough for a month-old puppy to fit under. The whelping box should be set up in a warm, quiet, safe location.

A heat lamp should be placed high enough that the bitch cannot contact it, but close enough to heat the area. It should only heat a corner of the whelping box, so if the puppies are too warm, they can move away from the heat source. The heat lamp light should be diffused with aluminum foil with holes poked in it with a needle. This protects the bulb from accidental contact and protects the puppies eyes from bright light.

Newspaper can be put in the whelping box during delivery. As it gets wet more layers are added. Once she is done whelping and is taken outside to relieve herself, the entire box is changed and dry paper put in with a blanket stretched tight over the top to give puppies traction.

Whelping supplies

Have large plastic garbage bags handy to place used newspaper, paper towels, and other garbage.

A laundry basket or box should be available to place puppies in while the rest of the litter is born. This protects them while the bitch paces and moves around during labor. A heating pad should be placed on the bottom with a fleece pad over it. (The puppies should NEVER be placed directly on heating pads, as they may be burned.) Another 1 or 2 towels should be placed over the top of the basket to keep the heat in. The fleece and the air in the basket should feel comfortably warm to your hand. If the puppies are moving around and crying, they are too cold or too hot. If they are bobbing their heads, searching, and crying, they are hungry. They should be put with mom as soon as possible to nurse. The puppies can be placed with the bitch between births to allow them to nurse and bond, and if necessary, be put back in the basket while the next sibling arrives.

A large stack of soft, clean towels should be handy to help clean off puppies if necessary. Large litters may require 2-3 dozen towels. White or light colored towels will show the color of any discharge or placenta. Have a laundry basket handy to throw them in as they are used. Wash as soon after birth as possible with detergent and bleach to minimize staining of the towels. An easy alternative is to use paper towel that can be discarded.

Other supplies to have on hand include the following:

  1. Sterile hemostats and blunt-end scissors to cut the umbilical cord, if necessary
  2. Alcohol and matches to sterilize the hemostats and scissors (dip the instrument in the alcohol, hold downward, light with a match - do not hold upward, as the alcohol (and fire) will go down your hand)
  3. Heavy sewing thread, dental floss, or suture (to tie umbilical cords if necessary)
  4. Lubricating (petroleum) jelly
  5. Several pairs of sterile surgical gloves
  6. Rubber pediatric bulb syringe or other suction devise to clear airways
  7. Surgical antiseptic scrub/iodine
  8. Tube feeder, syringe, bottle and nipple, and puppy milk replacer (such as Esbilac)
  9. Gram or ounce scale depending on average size of newborn puppy for your breed
  10. Stethoscope
  11. Nail polish to mark puppies for identification (puppies look remarkably similar and the best way to identify them is with marks)
  12. Thermometer – rectal to monitor the bitch's temperature
  13. Household thermometer to monitor the air temperature in the whelping box
  14. High-quality puppy food, cottage cheese, vanilla yogurt, and/or vanilla ice cream for the bitch
  15. Fresh water for the bitch
  16. Regular number for veterinary clinic and the emergency veterinary clinic number
  17. Numbers for family/friends/sitter to watch the children during delivery and, if necessary, to go to vet clinic
  18. Whelping books
  19. Vetwrap to wrap the tail of a long-haired bitch
  20. Flashlight with new batteries
  21. Clock or watch to time the birth
  22. Camera, film, and extra battery
  23. Something for you to do while waiting – cards, magazines, etc.
  24. Ink pen (and an extra) and note pad – mark each pup's arrival time, sex, weight, color, and markings (either natural markings or id mark you apply), and if placenta was expelled
  25. Make sure the phone cord reaches the whelping box or that the battery for the cordless phone is charged
  26. Cot for you to sleep
  27. Newspaper – to help line the floor of the whelping box
  28. Small Box or basket – to put the puppies in while another puppy is being delivered
  29. Hot water bottles – milk jugs, two-liter pop bottles, etc... You can use these to help keep puppies warm when they are in the small box away from mom
  30. Puppy Formula/Milk Replacer/Goats Milk – just in case there is a situation where mom cannot feed the pups
  31. Snacks for mom – yogurt, cottage cheese, goats milk, vanilla ice cream. It is a good idea to give her some high in calcium snacks AFTER she has had the first puppy. If there is a break in between puppies, sometimes a little calcium will help get labor started again
  32. Pen and paper – to record the puppy’s time of birth, weight, etc…
  33. Puppy Scale
  34. Vet and ER Vet Phone numbers –  You should have this info on hand in case a problem should arise where you need immediate vet assistance and your vet is not available (such as night time).
 German Shepherd Dog Training Toys...more

The GSD's high intelligence, strong athletic physique and silky smooth movement have seen the breed excel at all kinds of duties.

German Shepherds are trained and considered invaluable in such jobs as seeing eye dogs, police work, search and rescue, herding, protection, bomb and drug detection and as guard dogs. They also relish activities which stimulate their acute senses such as tracking, agility, fly ball, endurance work, schutzhund and German Shepherd obedience training.

Dogs have their own set of behavioral problems. Lack of proper training methods may badly affect your dog's behavior and turn your beloved pet into a disobedient, aggressive or unruly dog. As a dog owner you should be aware of these problems and train your dog accordingly.

If your dog bites or tears up your furniture, this is not the dog’s fault. These are types of behavior problems that most dogs show signs of having and it’s up to you, the owner, to train your dog to know what is acceptable and what is not.

Aggression related dog behavior problems include biting, jumping, barking uncontrollably and not obeying commands.

Once a dog ages from a puppy to an adult, it will become much harder to train. Training should start from an early stage, so that these tendencies do not become dog behavior problems.

 Veterinary Care Services for German Shepherds

German Shepherd Dog Veterinarian

Veterinarian's Oath

The Veterinarian's Oath was adopted by the American Veterinary Medical Association's House of Delegates July 1969, and amended by the AVMA Executive Board, November 1999 and December 2010.

Being admitted to the profession of veterinary medicine, I solemnly swear to use my scientific knowledge and skills for the benefit of society through the protection of animal health and welfare, the prevention and relief of animal suffering, the conservation of animal resources, the promotion of public health, and the advancement of medical knowledge.

I will practice my profession conscientiously, with dignity, and in keeping with the principles of veterinary medical ethics. I accept as a lifelong obligation the continual improvement of my professional knowledge and competence.

 German Shepherd Grooming Services, Dog Waste Supplies, Puppy Traing Supplies and More...

Daily grooming of the GSD boils down to this: a quick brushing to keep the coat clean and healthy and also to help to combat shedding. The German Shepherd sheds constantly throughout the entire year and even more heavily with the changing of the seasons. Daily or weekly brushings will substantially cut down on its shedding overall and the amount of dog hair found throughout your house and also the overall amount of time spent grooming the GSD and dog training can help this process be more smooth. You can also have a better idea of whether or not your dog has any parasites such as ticks or fleas while grooming your dog. Baths should be given no more than once or twice a year to avoid drying out their skin. Remember too that diet plays an important part in coat condition overall, so feeding quality foods will help prevent any skin problems from happening as well. Basic grooming tools needed for grooming the GSD: A coat rake, a shedding blade, and a metal comb for the thicker coated GSD's, brushes and nail clippers.

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Von Dynasty German Shepherds - Pastores alemanes Von Dynasty

Because all our breeding stock (male and female) are and come from families free of Dysplasia, this is not a minor issue is the result of good genetic selection and many years of work, today the achievement of this effort is reflected In our puppies and a
Argentina
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01/25/2017
Type: Offer

pastor alemão ornamento cão

Crie ornamentos especiais com fotos de sua familia, amigos ou alguém especial.
Brazil
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01/11/2015
Type: Offer

vom Haus Flamboyant - German Shepherds

Since 2000, the kennel has also been established in the region of Conservatória, in the mountains of Valença, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, in a place with a very pleasant climate.
Brazil
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09/09/2013
Type: Offer

"von Ghattas" - German Shepherds - Brazil

Canil de Pastores Alemães
Brazil
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02/25/2014
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WOLPERTINGER WALD German Shepherd Dog - Bulgaria

Breeding for Quality , NOT Quantity !
Bulgaria
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01/30/2014
Type: Offer

Watcher Engel K-9

Let our guardian angels help serve the ones you love
Connecticut
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03/11/2011
Type: Offer

Art z Lipin

German Shepherd Dogs from the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
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05/22/2015
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vit Glisnik světové kynologii

Expectation of outstanding character !!!
Czech Republic
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10/10/2014
Type: Offer

Kennels Z GARGAMELLU - Česká republika

Německý ovčák je u mě psem číslo jedna již od malička. Nejen pro svou krásu a ušlechtilost ale hlavně pro povahové vlastnosti.
Czech Republic
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09/26/2013
Type: Offer

ICE WINE KENNEL (FCI)

Home of the top quality Europen Winner's, Multichampion's & Clubwinner's White Swiss Sheperd dog's!
Hungary
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03/06/2015
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Viernheimi German Shepherd Dogs

Top Hungarian Breeder of German Shepherd dogs.
Hungary
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06/28/2011
Type: Offer

S​eelenvoll German Shepherds

Breeders of striking German Shepherd puppies with pedigrees from World Class lines...
Maine
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10/17/2015
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Baystate K-9 - Massachusetts

Mike has been involved with dog handling and training since 1990 and has trained well over 100,000 dogs
Massachusetts
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02/18/2016
Type: Offer

Kolenda Kennels - Michigan USA

Kolenda Kennels a German Shepherd Puppy Breeder is a personalized kennel that is dedicated to improving the German Shepherds breed, located near Grand Rapids, Michigan .
Michigan
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05/15/2011
Type: Offer

Minnesota K-9 Solutions

Quality German Shepherd Puppies Minnesota Puppies For Sale Minnesota German Shepherd Dog Breeders Minnesota Executive Protection Dogs Minnesota
Minnesota
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02/14/2013
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