Tell A Friend
Message
Your Name
Email
Friend's Email
Your code
Enter the code
 
Contact GSDSite staff
Message
Your Name
Email
Your code
Enter the code
 
Search for classifieds in Advanced
Home >>

Search Result

  Translation

 GSD Site Store

  Add Free Classifieds

Place Free Ads For The Below Categories Only

 German Shepherd Rescue

 Free/Lost/Found/Stolen/Missing German Shepherds Dogs



GSDsite.com

Promote Your Page Too

Scan this QR code with your Smart Phone or Tablet to save this Site!
Search Results
Classifieds found: 333 Pages: 1 2 3 4 > >>    
Sort by: Title - Description - Date created - Popularity - Price - Area name    
CATEGORIES
 K-9 German Shepherds

Law Enforcement K-9 German Shepherds or K9 is an abbreviation and homophone of Canine. It may refer to a variety of entries, most related to dogs.

The term originated in the military, where designations such as G-2 are common, making K-9 a rare official pun, being similar to "canine".

The term, originally referencing war dogs, has since carried over to police, and sentry and assistance/service dogs as well.

Police dogs are in widespread use across the United States. K-9 units are operated on the federal, state, county, and local level and are utilized for a wide variety of duties, similar to those of other nations. Although most Americans perceive these animals as attack dogs, their duties generally include drug, bomb, and weapon detection and cadaver searches. The most common police dogs used for everyday duties are German Shepherds, though other breeds may be used to perform specific tasks.

 German Shepherd Dog Canned Food

Making the right dog food choices

Although dry dog food is convenient to store, pet nutritionists such as DogAware.com's Mary Straus say that canned food can be better than dry food, mostly because it contains fewer preservatives (because the canning process itself acts as a preservative). Canned dog food generally contains less grain and more moisture, which helps keep a dog hydrated and benefits the urinary tract.

Like canned foods, the best dry dog foods have high-quality proteins (named meat and meat meals), along with high-quality carbohydrates, such as potatoes and whole grains. Lower-quality products instead may contain corn, wheat and soy, along with glutens and byproducts. Experts don't consider such ingredients to be highly desirable, and brands containing them may not be very palatable to dogs. Pound for pound, the well-known brands sold in supermarkets and major pet-food chains are obviously a lot cheaper. However, many pet-nutrition experts say that the initial cost difference doesn't tell the whole story. They note that the higher-quality ingredients in premium food mean your dog will actually eat less compared to inexpensive dog food. An added benefit is that because more of the food is absorbed as nutrients, your dog will pass less solid waste.

Experts also point out that suggested serving sizes are just that -- suggestions. Feeding needs vary greatly depending on your dog's breed and activity level, and serving guidelines are merely a good jumping-off point. A dog that spends all day running around in the yard will obviously need more food than a sedentary dog. Observation will tell you if your dog needs more or less food.

Dog food for life stages

Choosing the proper food has become even more challenging since manufacturers started labeling their foods as being suited for certain life stages, such as puppy, large adult or senior, or breeds. According to the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), the body that governs and regulates pet-food labeling, there are only two true designations: a formula for puppies and one for adult dogs. Puppy formulas generally have more calories and protein. Products labeled "senior" or "large breed" mean the food meets requirements for regular adult food. There's nothing regulating those additional terms when they're used on dog food packaging.

Change dog foods periodically, and alternate between dry dog food and canned food. Many experts say you should change brands every few months as well, which will ensure that any nutrient deficiencies in a particular food won't have long-term effects. Find three or four foods your dog likes and alternate among them. High-meat-content canned foods are best used as a supplement to a high-quality dry food.

Look for certification by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO). According to the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine website, "An AAFCO nutritional adequacy statement is one of the most important aspects of a dog or cat food label. A 'complete and balanced' pet food must be substantiated for nutritional adequacy by one of two means. The first method is for the pet food to contain ingredients formulated to provide levels of nutrients that meet an established profile. The alternative means of substantiating nutritional adequacy is for the product to be tested following the AAFCO Feeding Trial Protocols."

Choose a food that has whole meat or whole meat meal (lamb meal, chicken meal, etc.) as its top ingredients. Grain sources should also be whole grains, as opposed to glutens or other processed products. Rice and barley is better than corn or wheat. Avoid meat byproducts, particularly ones in which the meat is not named, and meat-and-bone meals.

Avoid BHT, BHA and ethoxyquin as preservatives. A better choice would be foods preserved with tocopherols (vitamin E) or vitamin C (ascorbate).

Observe your dog carefully when trying a new food. Some dogs need more protein and some need less, just as some dogs need to eat more than others, depending on activity level. Look for changes in coat and skin, along with stool consistency.

Pet-food safety is a concern. Past recalls of dog foods -- because of wheat and rice glutens contaminated with melamine -- have spotlighted some major issues regarding pet foods and their ingredients. Recent pet-food recalls have included ones for salmonella that have also made pet owners who had come in contact with the food fall ill. Although the majority of foods are deemed safe, this is clearly an ongoing issue.

 German Shepherd Collars

German Shepherd Dog Collars

Collars are worn by German Shepherd Dogs for training, walking, identification or even fashion. Use the following descriptions to find the right collar for your German Shepherd Dog.

 

Chain Slip Collars - Often called choke chains, these collars are intended for training purposes only. When training a dog to walk on a leash and heel, corrections are made with a quick tug on the leash, causing it to close somewhat on the dog’s neck. Over time, many dog trainers have moved away from the choke chain method. Generally, these collars are not recommended because they could damage your dog's neck. If you do choose to get a choke chain for your dog, learn how to use it properly. Chain slip collars should be used with caution and never be left on your dog when unattended, as they pose a strangulation hazard.

Metal Prong Collars - Despite their harsh appearance, many trainers find these collars effective for strong, stubborn dogs with a tendency to pull on the leash. Also known as pinch collars, they are used for correction during training, similar to chain slip collars. Also like the chain slip collars, metal prong collars should be used with caution and never be left on your dog when unattended.

Martingale Collars - Also know as limited slip collars or Greyhound collars, Martingale collars are used to prevent dogs from slipping out of collars while walking on a leash. Though the collars tighten with a tug of the leash, there is a stopping mechanism to prevent complete closure on the neck. Often made out of nylon or similar material, Martingale collars are available in a variety of colors and designs. These collars are especially suited for sighthounds, but can be uses on most dog breeds.

Everyday Collars - You can express your personal style with a variety of dog collars for everyday use. Collars with metal buckles or quick release clasps are available in a variety of materials, colors and styles. Many pet owners prefer buckle collars for stronger dogs, as quick release clasps tend to be less sturdy. Rolled leather collars are durable and less likely to cause hair loss or parting. Always be sure your dog's collar has a name tag with your current contact information.

Break-Away Collars - These collars are also for everyday use, but have a special safety feature to prevent choking. However, they can still be used for walking on a leash. The collar will break away if the loop becomes caught on something and your dog pulls away. When a leash is hooked onto both loops, you can walk your dog without the risk of the collar breaking away. Always be sure your dog’s collar has a name tag with your current contact information.

Head Collars - Head collars or halters slightly resemble muzzles, but they have a very different purpose. These halters act more like harnesses for the head and are intended to help train a dog to walk on a leash and heel. When a dog pulls on the leash, the halter will cause the head to turn. This feels unnatural and will deter the behavior. When used properly, head collars can successfully discourage pulling and support other training. Head halters should not be left on unattended dogs that are on a very long lead, as they may be able to back out of some types of head collars.

 

 German Shepherd Dog Waste Supplies and More

5 Important Reasons to Clean up Pet Waste

By Drs. Foster & Smith Veterinary Staff

Dealing with pet waste is one of those topics that every pet owner must deal with but no one likes to talk about. The fact is that the majority of community and neighborhood pet problems result from the inappropriate handling of pet waste. In addition, pet waste is the greatest source of potential health risk for your pet and your family. This article will highlight the five most important reasons to properly dispose of pet waste and will also give you some tips and products to make this chore easier.

#1. Disease Control

There are several very common diseases that can be transmitted to dogs, cats and people through feces. These include giardia, roundworms, salmonella, and Ecoli. In addition, your dog can spread or contract parvovirus or coronavirus through infected feces. All of these diseases are very serious and common and every effort should be made by pet owners to keep their pets and family away from potentially infected feces. One of the easiest ways to do this is to install an in-ground stool digester like the Doggie Dooley. These digesters work like mini septic systems, safely breaking down feces and then allowing the residue to harmlessly sink into the surrounding soil. These handy little gadgets are one of the best ways that I've ever found to deal with dog or cat waste.

#2. Make your Yard more Useable

Nobody likes to walk through a yard that is hiding "doggie land mines." If you and your children are afraid to use your yard because of the dog, then you are wasting one of your biggest time and financial investments. In addition, the pets will get less interactive exercise and suffer as well. Once or twice a day 'scooping' off your yard with a shovel or Grabber pet waste shovel will only take a couple of minutes and make it a place where everyone enjoys spending time.

#3. Fly Control

Flies will consume and lay eggs in feces. These same flies will then come into your house and then spread disease as they pause on your counter and food. Need I say more about keeping feces cleaned up to prevent this cycle?

#4. Responsible Pet Ownership

Your responsibility to clean up after your pet doesn't end when your dog leaves your yard. There are probably fewer things that aggravate neighbors more than a dog that 'goes' in their yard. Pet owners need to clean up after their pet every time they go to the bathroom. Period. No exceptions. If you are walking in the woods and your dog goes, then bury it. If you are in a park or neighborhood, pick it up with a plastic bag or a Dispoz-a-Scoop. If you don't have a yard, then walk your dog on a leash or get an electronic fence. Don't make your responsibility somebody else's problem.

#5. Preventing Stool Eating

While most dog owners think this doesn't apply to them or their dog, the shocking truth is that most dogs will engage in this unsavory practice at some point in their life. Dogs evolved as carnivore/scavengers and feces were considered fair game in lean times. To prevent this occasional indiscretion from becoming a life-long habit, clean up feces as soon as possible, especially in young dogs where the problem is most prevalent. At the first sign of this bad habit consider adding an oral product like Dis-Taste to your dog's food to decrease the palatability of the stools.

Dog poop, urine, and bathroom behavior can tell you a lot about your dog's health.

Chances are, you don't pay much attention to how often your dog does her business or what the results of that business (including dog poop color) look like. Dog stool is gross, it stinks and it belongs outside or in a designated indoor spot. But what else can dog feces tell you? Surprisingly, quite a lot.

"A dog's bowel and urinary habits are outward signs of her health status," says Bess Pierce, DVM, associate professor of community practice at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in Blacksburg, Virginia. "It is important to monitor the amount, frequency, color and consistency of dog feces and urine, giving particular attention to changes in normal pattern."

Determining that normal pattern may take time, because bathroom behavior and dog stool varies from dog to dog. Still, most dogs' bathroom behavior fits within a range, starting with their needing to take two to four bathroom breaks each day. As to what they produce during those bathroom breaks:

  • Dog urine should be light to medium yellow in color without a strong, objectionable odor
  • Dog poop should be moderately firm to firm, and the dog poop color should be a shade of brown.

At times, though, your dog's behavior and feces or urine may vary from that range. When that happens, your dog's body may be signaling the onset of a health problem. Here are some common variations and what they might mean:

1. Straining to urinate.

A dog who tries but can't produce much urine may have urinary stones, which can be fatal if left untreated. See a veterinarian immediately.

2. Very dark urine.

Extremely dark yellow or rust-colored urine may contain blood, which indicates the possibility of a urinary tract infection (UTI). A visit to the vet is in order.

3. Housetraining lapses.

A dog who suddenly starts urinating all over the house also needs to see a veterinarian. The problem could be a UTI or, if she's also drinking a lot of water, it could be a serious condition such as kidney disease, diabetes or Cushing's disease.

4. Straining to defecate.

If your dog's been trying to defecate for a day or so, but can't, she may have a bowel obstruction. Call your veterinarian. If she's vomiting, call sooner.

5. Dog diarrhea.

Runny, stinky dog poop may or may not be serious. Don't feed your dog for a day or so, but make sure she has plenty of water. After a day, start her on a bland diet such as a mixture of boiled rice and hamburger. If your dog still has the trots after two days, put in a call to your vet. If she's vomiting, call sooner. And if she's a young puppy who vomits more than once an hour over a half-day period, bring her to her vet immediately. (More info on Dog Diarrhea)

6. Very dark or black dog poop.

Black dog stool or very dark brown dog stool may signal bleeding in the upper intestinal tract, which can result from many possible problems. A veterinarian's attention is needed.

7. Grey dog feces.

Cement-colored stool may mean that a dog is suffering from an obstruction of the bile duct. The obstruction could have one of several causes -- but, in any case, necessitates a visit to the vet.

8. Changes in poop shape.

 

If your dog's stool is shaped like thin strips, her large intestine or rectum may be narrowed for some reason. On the other hand, very large stools may indicate a problem in the small intestine. Either way, a visit to the vet is in order.

 German Shepherd Customer, Owner, Trainer and and Personal GIFTS

German Shepherd Dog Gifts

Make every day a German Shepherd Day

Find gifts and unique gift ideas for your German Shepherd Dog Owner, Trainer, German Shepherd Dog Breeder or your German Shepherd Dog Customer.  At GSDsite.com we search the web to bring you great quality German Shepherd Dog gift ideas.

 

 German Shepherd Dog Whelping Supplies

The big day is fast approaching. You should have all of the supplies ready and waiting at least a week before the expected due date.

The whelping box is the single biggest item needed. It should provide enough room for the bitch to lay and stretch out comfortably without being so big that the puppies get 'lost.' For large breed dogs, it is also nice if a person can sit in the box with mom during labor and delivery and to play with the puppies later. The floor must be level and stable. The sides should be high enough to keep 4-week-old puppies in, but be hinged or have a door so the bitch can come and go. The sides may set inside the edges of the floor. This allows a blanket to be stretched tight over the floor and held in place by the sides. A safety rail is necessary around the entire perimeter. This allows the puppies to fit underneath in case the bitch lays down and they are in the way. It should be high and wide enough for a month-old puppy to fit under. The whelping box should be set up in a warm, quiet, safe location.

A heat lamp should be placed high enough that the bitch cannot contact it, but close enough to heat the area. It should only heat a corner of the whelping box, so if the puppies are too warm, they can move away from the heat source. The heat lamp light should be diffused with aluminum foil with holes poked in it with a needle. This protects the bulb from accidental contact and protects the puppies eyes from bright light.

Newspaper can be put in the whelping box during delivery. As it gets wet more layers are added. Once she is done whelping and is taken outside to relieve herself, the entire box is changed and dry paper put in with a blanket stretched tight over the top to give puppies traction.

Whelping supplies

Have large plastic garbage bags handy to place used newspaper, paper towels, and other garbage.

A laundry basket or box should be available to place puppies in while the rest of the litter is born. This protects them while the bitch paces and moves around during labor. A heating pad should be placed on the bottom with a fleece pad over it. (The puppies should NEVER be placed directly on heating pads, as they may be burned.) Another 1 or 2 towels should be placed over the top of the basket to keep the heat in. The fleece and the air in the basket should feel comfortably warm to your hand. If the puppies are moving around and crying, they are too cold or too hot. If they are bobbing their heads, searching, and crying, they are hungry. They should be put with mom as soon as possible to nurse. The puppies can be placed with the bitch between births to allow them to nurse and bond, and if necessary, be put back in the basket while the next sibling arrives.

A large stack of soft, clean towels should be handy to help clean off puppies if necessary. Large litters may require 2-3 dozen towels. White or light colored towels will show the color of any discharge or placenta. Have a laundry basket handy to throw them in as they are used. Wash as soon after birth as possible with detergent and bleach to minimize staining of the towels. An easy alternative is to use paper towel that can be discarded.

Other supplies to have on hand include the following:

  1. Sterile hemostats and blunt-end scissors to cut the umbilical cord, if necessary
  2. Alcohol and matches to sterilize the hemostats and scissors (dip the instrument in the alcohol, hold downward, light with a match - do not hold upward, as the alcohol (and fire) will go down your hand)
  3. Heavy sewing thread, dental floss, or suture (to tie umbilical cords if necessary)
  4. Lubricating (petroleum) jelly
  5. Several pairs of sterile surgical gloves
  6. Rubber pediatric bulb syringe or other suction devise to clear airways
  7. Surgical antiseptic scrub/iodine
  8. Tube feeder, syringe, bottle and nipple, and puppy milk replacer (such as Esbilac)
  9. Gram or ounce scale depending on average size of newborn puppy for your breed
  10. Stethoscope
  11. Nail polish to mark puppies for identification (puppies look remarkably similar and the best way to identify them is with marks)
  12. Thermometer – rectal to monitor the bitch's temperature
  13. Household thermometer to monitor the air temperature in the whelping box
  14. High-quality puppy food, cottage cheese, vanilla yogurt, and/or vanilla ice cream for the bitch
  15. Fresh water for the bitch
  16. Regular number for veterinary clinic and the emergency veterinary clinic number
  17. Numbers for family/friends/sitter to watch the children during delivery and, if necessary, to go to vet clinic
  18. Whelping books
  19. Vetwrap to wrap the tail of a long-haired bitch
  20. Flashlight with new batteries
  21. Clock or watch to time the birth
  22. Camera, film, and extra battery
  23. Something for you to do while waiting – cards, magazines, etc.
  24. Ink pen (and an extra) and note pad – mark each pup's arrival time, sex, weight, color, and markings (either natural markings or id mark you apply), and if placenta was expelled
  25. Make sure the phone cord reaches the whelping box or that the battery for the cordless phone is charged
  26. Cot for you to sleep
  27. Newspaper – to help line the floor of the whelping box
  28. Small Box or basket – to put the puppies in while another puppy is being delivered
  29. Hot water bottles – milk jugs, two-liter pop bottles, etc... You can use these to help keep puppies warm when they are in the small box away from mom
  30. Puppy Formula/Milk Replacer/Goats Milk – just in case there is a situation where mom cannot feed the pups
  31. Snacks for mom – yogurt, cottage cheese, goats milk, vanilla ice cream. It is a good idea to give her some high in calcium snacks AFTER she has had the first puppy. If there is a break in between puppies, sometimes a little calcium will help get labor started again
  32. Pen and paper – to record the puppy’s time of birth, weight, etc…
  33. Puppy Scale
  34. Vet and ER Vet Phone numbers –  You should have this info on hand in case a problem should arise where you need immediate vet assistance and your vet is not available (such as night time).
 German Shepherd Dog Food Dry

German Shepherd Dog Dry Dog Food

Advantages of Dry

1. Convenience: If you're one of those dog owners that likes to pour the dog food in your dog’s dish and then just leave it for the rest of the day, this would definitely be more convenient for you. There is one disadvantage to that, though. It can cause obesity. Most dogs will eat what's in front of them whether it's one cup or three cups. A measured amount once in the morning and once in the evening is always the best habit to get into.

2. Less Expensive:  Dry dog food is less expensive than wet,  but always make sure you read labels. You should always have either your protein or carbohydrate listed first followed by a good fat. Here is an example of what the label should look like: Chicken, chicken meal, potatoes chicken fat (this includes any protein like beef, chicken, lamb, fish, bison, venison, etc) Or Potatoes, chicken, (or chicken meal) chicken fat (this includes sweet potatoes and BROWN rice...never white rice), any protein and/or protein meal) Do not buy food that has corn (this is just a filler), soy (causes a lot of allergies) or white rice. There is no nutritional value in this food. NEVER buy anything that has by-products of any kind in it!

3. Caloric Density: There is much more caloric density in dry dog food due to wet having a lot of water in it. Remember, if you are going with dry, "premium" dog foods are better. Please understand that even though it will cost you more at the cash register, you will use less at feeding time due to its nutritional value, therefore, the cost will actually seem the same.

 German Shepherd Dog Digestive Tract & Internal Medications

German Shepherd Dog Digestive Tract Care

 

German Shepherds are notorious for digestive problems, especially chronic diarrhea caused by food intolerances, colitis (inflammatory bowel disease), hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, or pancreatic insufficiency. This breed should be eating real food for sure, not an artificial diet of kibble or canned food.

As with all deep-chested breeds, German Shepherds are at higher-than-normal risk for the emergency gastrointestinal syndrome bloat.

Pet owners who feed their companion pets correctly can save a lot of money. Many dogs are taken to the vet, suffering from nutritionally related problems, and the vet bills can be huge. i.e. dry/itchy/flaky skin, hot spots, yeast infections in the ear, thyroid - liver - kidney problems, just to name a few, cost the average dog owner hundreds of dollars every year.

The food should contain: (#1) nutrient sources that are similar to those found in the native environment of the breed's ancestors (sources which are not foreign to the digestive and glandular systems of today's German Shepherd Dog and which are easy for them to assimilate) and (#2) the proper balance of protein, carbohydrates, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals that match the breed specific nutritional requirements - those which have been passed on by their ancestors.

 German Shepherd Treats

Healthy Dog Treats

Choosing the best dog snacks is not only a great way to show your precious pet that you care, it’s also a great way to foster successful training, better nutrition, and good oral hygiene. Believe it or not, dog treats have become a billion dollar business. So, wading through the sea of dog treats can be difficult. Still the best dog treats will depend upon your dog’s needs. GSDsite focusus on the best dog snacks in respect to healthy choices, organic and natural options, and popular flavors. When you start to look at the best dog snacks for your dog, consider your pet’s weight, dental needs, age, size, and current health problems.  Today’s top dog treats are healthier than ever before. So, be sure to read nutrition labels.

 German Shepherd Dog Allergy Medication

German Shepherd Allergies

 

There is a wide variety of allergies that dogs can suffer from. While they typically become visible through skin conditions, there are a number of other symptoms and warning signs to look for.

Dog allergies can happen just like in their human companions. These allergies usually manifest themselves as skin conditions. What this will do is provoke the immune system of the dog to overreact in the form of a number of different symptoms, most notably a skin irritation. Unfortunately, allergies are becoming more common every day just as they are with humans.

Skin irritation from allergies is fairly easy to identify. Some of the symptoms are redness, itching, hair loss and recurring skin infections from the irritation. The dog may begin to scratch himself more thus bringing on the skin problems.

When looking for symptoms, there are various things that can help to identify if the dog is suffering from allergies. Sometimes, cigar shaped mites will appear on the dog’s skin. These mites are located in the hair follicle and oil glands of the skin. While it is possible to identify what type of allergies the dog is suffering from, it is best to seek attention from a veterinarian to identify the best treatment possible.

There are a number of different kinds of dog allergies dogs may be suffering from. The five main allergies include food allergies, flea allergies, bacteria, contact, and atopy allergies.

 German Shepherd Schutzhund/IPO Clubs and Organizations

Schutzhund (German for "protection dog") is a dog sport that was developed in Germany in the early 1900s as a breed suitability test for the German Shepherd Dog. The test would determine if the dog displayed the appropriate traits and characteristics of a proper working German Shepherd Dog. Today, it is used as a sport where many breeds other than German Shepherd Dogs can compete, but it is a demanding test for any dog that few can pass.

Traits of Schutzhund dogs

Schutzhund tests dogs of all breeds for the traits necessary for police-type work. Dogs that pass Schutzhund tests should be suitable for a wide variety of tasks: police work, specific odor detection, search and rescue, and many others. The purpose of Schutzhund is to identify dogs that have or do not have the character traits required for these demanding jobs. Some of those traits are:

  • Strong desire to work
  • Courage
  • Intelligence
  • Trainability
  • Strong bond to the handler
  • Perseverance
  • Protective Instinct
  • Sense of Smell

Schutzhund tests for these traits. It also tests for physical traits such as strength, endurance, agility, and scenting ability. The goal of Schutzhund is to illuminate the character and ability of a dog through training. Breeders can use this insight to determine how and whether to use the dog in producing the next generation of working dogs.

History

In response to political forces in Germany, in 2004 the Verein für Deutsche Schäferhunde (SV) and the Deutscher Hundesportverein (DHV) made substantial changes to Schutzhund. The DHV adopted the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) rules that govern IPO titles, so that at least on paper the SV and DHV gave up control of the sport to the FCI. The DHV changed the name of the titles from "SchH" (Schutzhund) to "VPG" (Vielseitigkeitsprüfung für Gebrauchshunde which roughly translates Versatility examination for working dogs). The SV has retained the "SchH" title names, but otherwise conforms to the DHV/FCI rules.

Description

There are three schutzhund titles: Schutzhund 1 (SchH1), Schutzhund 2 (SchH2), and Schutzhund 3 (SchH3). SchH1 is the first title and SchH3 is the most advanced. Additionally, before a dog can compete for an SchH1, he must pass a temperament test called a B or BH (Begleithundprüfung, which translates as "traffic-sure companion dog test"). The B tests basic obedience and sureness around strange people, strange dogs, traffic, and loud noises. A dog that exhibits excessive fear, distractibility, or aggression cannot pass the B and so cannot go on to schutzhund.

The Schutzhund test has changed over the years. Modern Schutzhund consists of three phases: tracking, obedience, and protection. A dog must pass all three phases in one trial to be awarded a schutzhund title. Each phase is judged on a 100-point scale. The minimum passing score is 70 for the tracking and obedience phases and 80 for the protection phase. At any time the judge may dismiss a dog for showing poor temperament, including fear or aggression.

Phase

Description

Tracking

The tracking phase tests not only the dog's scenting ability, but also its mental soundness and physical endurance. In the tracking phase, a track layer walks across a field, dropping several small articles along the way. After a period of time, the dog is directed to follow the track while being followed by the handler on a 33 foot leash. When the dog finds each article, he indicates it, usually by lying down with the article between his front paws. The dog is scored on how intently and carefully it follows the track and indicates the articles. The length, complexity, number of articles, and age of the track varies for each title.

Obedience

The obedience phase is done in a large field, with the dogs working in pairs. One dog is placed in a down position on the side of the field and its handler leaves it while the other dog works in the field. Then the dogs switch places. In the field, there are several heeling exercises, including heeling through a group of people. There are two or three gunshots during the heeling to test the dog's reaction to loud noises. There are one or two recalls, three retrieves (flat, jump and A-frame), and a send out, in which the dog is directed to run away from the handler straight and fast and then lie down on command. Obedience is judged on the dog's accuracy and attitude. The dog must show enthusiasm. A dog that is uninterested or cowering scores poorly.

Protection

In the protection phase, the judge has an assistant, called the "helper", who helps him or her test the dog's courage to protect himself and his handler and its ability to be controlled while doing so. The helper wears a heavily padded sleeve on one arm. There are several blinds, placed where the helper can hide, on the field. The dog is directed to search the blinds for the helper. When it finds the helper, it indicates this by barking. The dog must guard the helper to prevent him from moving until recalled by the handler. There follows a series of exercises similar to police work where the handler searches the helper and transports him to the judge. At specified points, the helper either attacks the dog or the handler or attempts to escape. The dog must stop the attack or the escape by biting the padded sleeve. When the attack or escape stops, the dog is commanded to "out," or release the sleeve. The dog must out or it is dismissed. At all times the dog must show the courage to engage the helper and the temperament to obey the handler while in this high state of drive. Again, the dog must show enthusiasm. A dog that shows fear, lack of control, or inappropriate aggression is dismissed.

 

Training

Schutzhund training, like the sport itself, has evolved over the years. The definitive description of Schutzhund training in the first 50 years of the sport is Col. Konrad Most's Dog Training: A Manual, 1910 By modern standards, Most's training is very harsh and possibly abusive. Despite this, it is also structured, consistent, and in many ways conforms to more recent ideas on learning theory. Over time, the more brutal techniques fell out of use and few trainers still follow Most's program. In 1981, Helmut Raiser published Der Schutzhund (English trans. by Armin Winkler, 1999 (no ISBN)), which radically changed Schutzhund protection training. In the US, the next great change in Schutzhund training is marked by the 1991 publication of Schutzhund Theory & Training Methods by Susan Barwig and Stewart Hilliard. Also see TOP WORKING DOGS, A Schutzhund Training Manual by Dr. Dietmar Schellenberg, first published in 1982. With the fifth edition in

A reliable source for training information is a good Schutzhund club. The overwhelming majority of Schutzhund training is done by owner/handlers at local clubs. There are very few clubs in the US, making books and videos a vital source of information in that country. In the US, most clubs are affiliated with the American Working Dog Federation (AWDF), United States Boxer Association (USBA), American Working Malinois Association (AWMA), United Schutzhund Clubs of America (USA), Deutscher Verband der Gebrauchshundsportvereine (DVG), or German Shepherd Dog Club of America-Working Dog Association (GSDCA-WDA). Schutzhund clubs tend to be small, 20 or less members, because there is a limit to the number of dogs that can be trained in one session. Clubs often provide only limited formal assistance with tracking and obedience. To a certain extent, the clubs exist to provide the specialized resources needed to train the protection phase. However, a legitimate club will not permit a member to train only protection. Usually the more experienced members are willing to help the novice with tracking and obedience, though this is typically somewhat informal in the US.

Another function of Schutzhund clubs is to identify dogs that should not be trained in Schutzhund. Schutzhund is a challenging test of a dog's character, and not every dog, or even every GSD, is up to the challenge. The training director of the club has a responsibility to the dog, handler, club, and society to constantly evaluate every dog and to decline to train any dog with questionable character or working ability. Training a dog that does not really want to work is stressful and frustrating for all parties involved.

Schutzhund clubs regularly hold public trials, providing the opportunity for dogs to earn titles and for handlers to assess their training progress. A tiny number of dedicated handlers have trained their dogs to title readiness strictly from books and videos. This is unlikely to succeed in most cases, because it is almost impossible to train the protection phase without a helper. A good club should be considered a necessity for Schutzhund training.

Organizations

Schutzhund is governed by a number of organizations. The FCI, the international umbrella organization for all things dog related, sets the rules for IPO titles. (IPO is the FCI name for sport Schutzhund titles.) The AZG sets the rules for Schutzhund for all breeds. The AZG is one of the component organizations of the VDH, the all breed kennel club of Germany. The German Shepherd Dog Club of Germany, the SV, is a member of the VDH and arguably the most powerful influence on the sport. Although the AZG formally sets the rules, the AZG does nothing with respect to Schutzhund without the approval of the SV. Still, the SV has great influence in the FCI and is probably still the most powerful influence on the sport. The DVG is an all-breed dog sport organization in Germany that organizes clubs and trials and has branches in Canada and The United States.

The largest Schutzhund organization in the US is the United Schutzhund Clubs of America, called USCA. In spite of its name, USCA is a German Shepherd Dog breed club. The Working Dog Association is a branch of another GSD breed club, the German Shepherd Dog Club of America, which also sponsors clubs and trials. There are a small number of DVG clubs in the United States, various other breed organizations that are involved in Schutzhund, and the American Working Dog Federation (AWDF), which is an umbrella organization. There are other breed specific Schutzhund clubs such as the United Doberman Club. In the case of the Doberman the AKC will not allow you to add Schutzhund titles to your dog's pedigree unless they are earned with the United Doberman Club. This barely scratches the surface.

 Medical Alert Bracelets, Charms, Keychains and more.

Who Should Wear a Medical ID?

That's a question we are asked each day at GSDsite.com and a question that you, at some point, may have asked yourself.  There are common misconceptions that by wearing a medical ID you are labeling yourself or bringing unwanted attention to your condition or diagnosis.  The truth is that medical Identification can be, and often times is, life saving. 

If you have been recently diagnosed with a medical condition, a quick diagnosis of your condition will lead to faster and more effective treatment.  Your medical ID bracelet or necklace will alert doctors, paramedics and school nurses of your medical history so that time is not wasted.

Who should wear a medical ID?  

If you’ve been diagnosed with a chronic condition, have food or drug allergies or take medications, then you should wear a medical ID.  Any of the following conditions may alter the treatment you might normally receive. If you are a caregiver you should also wear a medical ID to alert emergency personnel of your loved one who needs attention. Let your medical identification jewelry speak for you when you can’t.

Here is a short list of conditions and people who should wear a medical ID bracelet or medical ID necklace.  If we left anything out of this list, please bring that to our attention by commenting on this post.

  • Diabetes
  • PTSD
  • Heart Patients with Pacemakers, Heart Stents, Atrial Fibrillation, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Arrhythmia
  • Hypertension
  • Lympedema Alert
  • Food Allergies including Peanut Allergy, Tree Nut Allergy, Gluton Intolerace including Celiacs Disease
  • Allergy to Medications such as Penicillin Allergy, Sulfa Allergy, Morphine Allergy, Allergy to Contrast Dye, Bee Sting Allergy, Allergic to Cephalosporins
  • Asthma
  • On Blood Thinners, Von Willebrand's, Hemophilia
  • Gastric Bypass Patient, Lap Band Patient
  • Alzheimers, Memory Impaired
  • Manic Depressive, Schizophrenia
  • Hearing Impaired, Cochlear Implant, Sight Impaired
  • Organ Transplant Patient, Organ Donor
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Adrenal Insufficiency
  • Autism
  • COPD, Seizure Disorder
  • Epilepsy
  • On Multiple Medications
  • No MRI
  • Any other Chronic Condition 
 German Shepherd Crates, Ramps, Dog Houses, Beds, Steps, Car Seat Covers and more.....

"Private room with a view. Ideal for traveling dogs or for those who just want a secure, quiet place to hang out at home."

That's how your dog might describe his crate. It's his own personal den where he can find comfort and solitude while you know he's safe and secure—and not shredding your house while you're out running errands.

Crating philosophy:

Crate training uses a dog's natural instincts as a den animal. A wild dog's den is his home, a place to sleep, hide from danger, and raise a family. The crate becomes your dog's den, an ideal spot to snooze or take refuge during a thunderstorm.

The primary use for a crate is housetraining. Dogs don't like to soil their dens. The crate can limit access to the rest of the house while he learns other rules, like not to chew on furniture.

Crates are a safe way to transport your dog in the car.

Crating caution!

A crate isn't a magical solution. If not used correctly, a dog can feel trapped and frustrated. Never use the crate as a punishment. Your dog will come to fear it and refuse to enter it. Don't leave your dog in the crate too long. A dog that’s crated day and night doesn't get enough exercise or human interaction and can become depressed or anxious. You may have to change your schedule, hire a pet sitter, or take your dog to a doggie daycare facility to reduce the amount of time he must spend in his crate every day.

Puppies under six months of age shouldn't stay in a crate for more than three or four hours at a time. They can't control their bladders and bowels for that long. The same goes for adult dogs that are being housetrained. Physically, they can hold it, but they don’t know they’re supposed to. Crate your dog only until you can trust him not to destroy the house. After that, it should be a place he goes voluntarily.

Selecting a crate Several types of crates are available:

Plastic (often called "flight kennels") Fabric on a collapsible, rigid frame Collapsible, metal pens Crates come in different sizes and can be purchased at most pet supply stores or pet supply catalogs. Your dog's crate should be just large enough for him to stand up and turn around in. If your dog is still growing, choose a crate size that will accommodate his adult size.

 German Shepherd Ornaments

German Shepherd Ornaments

Bring a lot more holiday cheer to your tree with a custom ceramic ornament. A strand of gold thread makes it easy to hang this fantastic keepsake.

  • Dimensions: 3"l x 2.8"w; Weight: 1.375 oz.
  • Made of white porcelain
  • Full-color, full-bleed printing
  • Printing on both sides
  • All Ornaments have different Specifications in sizes and styles.
 German Shepherd Dog Flea, Worm, Parasite and Tick Medicine

Dog Fleas

Fleas are wingless insects, 1/16 to 1/8-inch (1.5 to 3.3 mm) long, that are agile, usually dark colored (for example, the reddish-brown of the cat flea), with tube-like mouth parts adapted to feeding on the blood of their hosts. Their legs are long, the hind pair well adapted for jumping; a flea can jump vertically up to 7 in (18 cm) and horizontally up to 13 in (33 cm), making the flea one of the best jumpers of all known animals (relative to body size).

Once the flea reaches adulthood, its primary goal is to find blood and then to reproduce Its total life span can be as long as one and one-half years in ideal conditions. Female fleas can lay 5000 or more eggs over their life, allowing for phenomenal growth rates. Average 30–90 days.

The bites often appear in clusters or lines of two bites, and can remain itchy and inflamed for up to several weeks afterwards. Fleas can also lead to hair loss as a result of frequent scratching and biting by the animal, and can cause anemia in extreme cases.

Dog Ticks

Ticks are invertebrate animals in the phylum Arthropoda, and are related to spiders. Ticks are in the subclass Acari which consists of many orders of mites and one tick order, the Ixodida. Some mites are parasitic, but all ticks are parasitic feeders on blood.

Ehrlichiosis also known as canine rickettsiosis, canine hemorrhagic fever, canine typhus, tracker dog disease, and tropical canine pancytopenia is a tick-borne disease of dogs usually caused by the organism Ehrlichia canis. Ehrlichia canis is the pathogen of animals. Humans can become infected by E. canis and other species after tick exposure. German Shepherd Dogs are thought to be susceptible to a particularly severe form of the disease, other breeds generally have milder clinical signs.

Dog Worms

Be aware of risk factors for specific types of worms. Because worms can look very similar, one of the best ways to identify the type of parasite that is plaguing your dog is to understand the environmental or situational factors that most lead to each type of worms.

    Roundworms are often passed to puppies from a roundworm-infested mother because the eggs and larvae cross the placenta to infect the puppy in the womb, and eggs are also excreted in the mother's milk. Puppies should be wormed as a matter of routine.

    Tapeworms are caused by a dog’s eating vermin already infected with tapeworm, or from fleas that contain tapeworm eggs. Thus, hunting dogs or dogs with a flea infestation are likely to pick up tapeworms.

    Hookworms and Whipworms thrive in damp soil and the dogs most at risk are those kept on grass runs, especially in warm, humid conditions. These infections are more common in kenneled dogs that have access to communal grassy runs.

    Heartworm is spread by insects such as mosquitoes and is therefore endemic in certain areas where insects are more common. High risk areas include the Southeastern and Midwestern United States and along the Atlantic coast.

    Lungworm is becoming more prevalent and is spread via fox feces, slugs, and snails. Contact with any of these is considered a risk factor.

Intestinal parasites

        Hookworms* Signs include diarrhea, vomiting, and weight loss.

        Tapeworms* are also common and in the dog, which is spread by ingesting fleas and lice. There are usually no symptoms.

        Roundworms*. Signs are usually mild, but may include diarrhea, pot-bellied appearance, poor growth, and vomiting.

    Fleas* in dogs cause itching and hair loss. The most common flea in dogs is the cat flea, followed by the dog flea.

    Ticks* are an external parasite of the dog and can spread diseases such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever. They can also cause a neurological disorder known as tick paralysis.

    Heartworm disease in dogs is spread by mosquitoes and is spread by the parasite Dirofilaria immitis. Signs include cough, difficulty breathing, and death.

    Mites* Ear mites in dogs are microscopic. Symptoms include itching, inflammation, and black debris in the ear.

        Cheyletiellosis is a mild pruritic skin disease in dogs. Humans can be transiently infected.

        Chiggers*, also known as harvest mites, can cause itching, redness and crusting in dogs.

        Mange in dogs include demodectic mange and sarcoptic mange. Signs include hair loss, redness, and scaling, and is not contagious to humans! Sarcoptic mange. Signs include intense itching and scaling, and is contagious to humans.

    Demodex These mites can cause inflammation and hair loss, they can also lead to secondary bacterial infections such as fever, lethargy, and enlarged lymph nodes.

    Sarcoptes scabiei is a mite that burrows into humans and dogs alike and causes scabies. There is only one symptom, itchy and red skin.

    Echinococcus granulosus is an infectious disease infecting dogs and sheep.

    Gnathostoma is a disease from mammal feces and undercooked seafood.

 German Shepherd Clocks and Watches

German Shepherd Clocks and Watches

    

Treat yourself, to these Awesome German Shepherd Clocks and German Shepherd Watches. The perfect gift for housewarming, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Christmas, birthday, retirement, or for no reason at all.

 

 

Search Results

Beware of Watch Dog! Yard Sign

German Shepherd Warning Sign
United States
Show detailsDetails
11/18/2018

Von Dynasty German Shepherds - Pastores alemanes Von Dynasty

Because all our breeding stock (male and female) are and come from families free of Dysplasia, this is not a minor issue is the result of good genetic selection and many years of work, today the achievement of this effort is reflected In our puppies and a
Argentina
Show detailsDetails
01/25/2017
Type: Offer

Von Klein Stein Working Dogs

Criss has competed in both Schutzhund and AKC competitions. Through his wide knowledge in dog training, he has trained and assisted hundreds of K-9 teams.
Arkansas
Show detailsDetails
04/13/2013
Type: Offer

I Will Live and Die For You German Shepherd Shirt

German Shepherd Shirt Designed By GSDsite.com
Australia/Oceania
Show detailsDetails
02/13/2015

German Shepherd Looking Out Window Silver-Colored Square Key Ring

Premium German Shepherd Square Key Ring
Australia/Oceania
Show detailsDetails
01/02/2017

Beautiful German Shepherd Christmas Card

GSDsite's customised German Shepherd greeting cards are the perfect way to convey your wishes on any occasion.
Australia/Oceania
Show detailsDetails
10/17/2017

vom Haus Flamboyant - German Shepherds

Since 2000, the kennel has also been established in the region of Conservatória, in the mountains of Valença, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, in a place with a very pleasant climate.
Brazil
Show detailsDetails
09/09/2013
Type: Offer

Broomeacres German Shepherds

Our goal is to breed puppies with sound minds and healthy bodies combined with balanced temperaments, and that noble look.
British Columbia
Show detailsDetails
06/15/2013
Type: Offer

Bullinger Shepherds

Bullinger German Shepherds has been the undefeated #1 Breeding Kennel every year we have competed at the Canadian Nationals.
British Columbia
Show detailsDetails
03/31/2013
Type: Offer

WOLPERTINGER WALD German Shepherd Dog - Bulgaria

Breeding for Quality , NOT Quantity !
Bulgaria
Show detailsDetails
01/30/2014
Type: Offer

DANCES WITH WOLVES RANCH

** ARCTIC WHITE** ALL PARENTS IMPORTED FROM EUROPE **
California
Show detailsDetails
04/14/2013
Type: Offer

ADLER STEIN KENNELS

WORKING GERMAN SHEPHERD DOGS
California
Show detailsDetails
03/12/2017
Type: Offer

German Shepherd Mom Hat

Available in 11 color combinations
Canada
Show detailsDetails
03/22/2015
Type: Offer

German Shepherd Mom Keychain Silver-Colored Round Keychain

5 Differnet Key Chain Styles Available
Canada
Show detailsDetails
05/05/2015
Type: Offer

German Shepherd Wall Clock

The unique German Shepherd printed face design looks great & is sure to make your wall clock the centerpiece of your home, office or kitchen
Canada
Show detailsDetails
12/29/2016


All About The German Shepherd : German Shepherd Types and Lines : Designations : German Shepherd Colors and Saddle Types : German Shepherd Dog Names
Schutzhund - IPO : Common German Shepherd Dog Medical Conditions : German Shepherd Dog Anatomy : German Shepherd Dog Heat Stroke Prevention
Deutsch Schäferhund Breed History : The Origins of the Domestic Dog : Cold Weather Precautions For German Shepherd Dogs
Knowing Dog CPR : How Dogs Know What You're Feeling : A dog's tail can tell you a lot more than you might think
German Shepherd Dog Training Tips : About Us : Contact : Privacy Policy : Web Site Agreement

Copyright © 2010-2019 German Shepherds. All Rights Reserved